Community Lives: Mojito: birth of a new community

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Jeannette Stewart
Multilingual January/February 2017
Columns and Commentary

First things first: the name. I was surprised to learn that Mojito owes nothing to its namesake, the Cuban cocktail. The name is derived from the team’s name, which is Moji. Box’s globalization effort was launched in Japan and moji is Japanese for character. We all know this from the now ubiquitous and Unicode-approved emoji we use in our messages and emails. The Japanese term mojibake, which is used to indicate corrupted characters, was what led to the name Team Moji and consequently Mojito.

Team Moji was tasked with responding to the question, “How do you localize continuously without compromising the integrity of your apps or breaking your development process?”...

Localization has increased the complexity of the project life cycle and this demands greater management resources. It’s impossible to envisage today’s business and cultural environments without the benefits of widespread automation. Translators are all too aware of this and the advent of localization engineering has spawned many tools to assist in the process. Where does Mojito fit in the big picture of all these competing ventures? The simple fact is that most continuous localization apps are offered by companies at a price. Mojito has been designed as a foundation that will cover continuous localization at any company and if it doesn’t cover their particular use cases, they can tailor the software to their specific needs. That’s the strength and beauty of the open source model. The buzzword is “agile.” Given the startling diversity of content that can exist in a single business entity, companies must be able to adapt instantly to evolving business requirements. Furthermore, as the pool of commercially-viable languages grows, agility must at times become acrobatic to meet needs. Mojito owes its existence to the fact that Box is an enterprise company, which means that they take the initiative to make things happen. As they spread their commercial wings and cover more and more of the globe, the content they generate proliferates at a rate of knots. How then to maintain standards of quality, reliability and security?...


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