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Personalization and Design

Going Native: Chinese Mobile UX

Shout out for a great article by Dan Grover (@dangrover), writing about Chinese mobile app user interface trends. Dan relocated from San Francisco to China, and used this move to document and share some great insights into Chinese user experience that are invaluable for localization too. Check out the examples. I love the sections on how discovery is...

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Fitness Bands for Christmahanakwanzika*? Ponder the L10n

Fitness bands and devices are massively popular (I am a major offender), but that may come under pressure from other wearable tech soon (translation: smart watches). Perhaps one of those little devices will turn up as a gift for you around this time of year. I just noticed this Fitbit gamification badge pop up in my email. Very nice...

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Minimum Viable Product: Globalization

Yes, been waiting to get a Silicon Valley-style allusion to MVP (Minimum Viable Product) into a blog post for ages. And now, thanks to Java and Android guru and i18n veteran John O’Conner (@joconner), here it is: The Absolute Minimum You Need to Know About Internationalization A simple, straightforward and understandable list of the key things...

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The Localizer's Best Friend: t()

I’m always on the lookout for software development solutions that are smart, disruptive, novel, and that challenge assumptions to solve a business problem. I recently attended an SF Globalization meetup event in San Francisco hosted by Airbnb. There, I saw localization (and UX) convention stood on its head by something anyone working in developer relations...

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Transifex: A Language Developers Understand

I’m hearing great things from software professionals about Transifex, a SaaS translation solution based in Silicon Valley.  As I work in user experience developer relations, I Skyped in Dimitris Glezos (@glezos), Transifex founder and Chief Ninja, in Greece to find out more. Dimitris’s background is in software development, Transifex originating as an open source project. The...

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Working Out Context in the Enterprise: Localize That!

I just came across an interesting terminology issue for enterprise applications’ user experience and localization, generally. What should we call the people in an organization who do the work of the business and rely on software to help them do so? Take the English language term worker appearing in a software application’s user interface (UI)....

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Correct Youse of English: Your Personal Dialect Map is Here

Thought I was done with regional English? No chance. The Irish Times recently predicted that the phrase “you guys” will soon be accepted as the new second-person plural pronoun in English. As a native Dubliner, I am very familiar with such evolution, the locals already having adopted “youse” and “yiz” as replacements for the pronoun. As...

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Google Glass Exploration: A Global Heads Up

If you’re a fan of the cultural dimensions of information and communications technology and also into wearables, then you might like to play at being a Geert Hofstede or Edward T. Hall over the Holidays. Read and analyze the blog “Heads Up on Displays: Exploring Google Glass Globally” to satisfy your inner academic. You may even come...

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Noli Timere: Seamus Heaney, Translation, and a Wall in Dublin

Seamus Heaney, the Irish poet and playwright, passed away in Dublin on 30 August, 2013, after a short illness. His last words, sent by text message to his wife, Marie, minutes before he died, were Noli timere (Latin for Do not be afraid). I took the photograph below in Dublin, a short walk from my...

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DARE to be HyperLocal: Context and Language at the Mall

I love this piece about regional language preferences from the San Francisco Chronicle blog, “Which Words Are Special to Californian?”. It offers us a look at the Harvard University Press Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE), described as “…an Urban Dictionary you can share with your parents and co-workers without fear of being disowned or...

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