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Jan/Feb 2021

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Jan/Feb 2021

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I

think we can all agree that 2020 was a wild ride, and we all have high hopes for 2021. We’re doing our part by re-launching our print edition of the magazine — if you’ve missed a fully tangible, bendable MultiLingual, this is already a return to normalcy.

As far as the content goes, we’re taking our cue from what we hope for the future: the best of what has been, updated and re-imagined for the realities to come. This issue focuses on tech, and specifically, how to make it work for you. Because what good is the future if it’s not friendly?

Throughout 2021, MultiLingual is committed to nurturing our traditions of goodwill and neutral reporting, and trying out new things. As always, we welcome feedback and engagement.

Happy new year, and to all our readers, writers, sponsors, friends, and colleagues, may it be the best one yet.

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#193 Volume 32 Issue 1 January/February 2021

Chief Executive Officer: Marjolein Groot Nibbelink
Publisher: Katie Botkin
Layout and Design: Elias Carlson
Cover Illustration: Scott Scoggin
Editor-in-Chief: Katie Botkin
Subscription Management: Terri Jadick
Advertising Director: Marjolein Groot Nibbelink
Chief Marketing Officer: Nika Allahverdi
Marketing Coordinator: Evelyn Najarian
Chief Information Officer: Aleksey Schipack
Digital Production Manager: Oleg Schipack
Staff Writers: Jonathan Pyner, Katie Botkin
Chief Financial Officer: Kristen Glant
Chairman of the Board: Renato Beninatto
Board Director: Tucker Johnson

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Editorial Board
Games: Miguel Á. Bernal-Merino
Standards: David Filip
Business: Aki Ito
Marketing: Nataly Kelly
User Experience: Ultan Ó Broin
Interpreting: Barry Slaughter Olsen
Technology: Jost Zetzsche

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MultiLingual (ISSN 1523-0309), Copyright © 2021 by MultiLingual Media LLC, is published bimonthly: Jan/Feb, Mar/Apr, May/Jun, Jul/Aug, Sep/Oct, Nov/Dec. by MultiLingual Media LLC., 319 North 1st Avenue, Suite 2, Sandpoint, ID 83864-1495. Business and Editorial Offices: 319 North 1st Avenue, Suite 2, Sandpoint, ID 83864-1495. Accounting Offices: 515 30th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98144-2509. Circulation Offices: 319 North 1st Avenue, Suite 2, Sandpoint, ID 83864-1495. Email [email protected] to subscribe. Periodicals postage paid at Sandpoint, ID and additional mailing offices.

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Contents

MultiLingual logo

Focus:

AI and Making Localization Tech Work for You

Review

Nicole Keller

Column

Terena Bell

Column

Christophe Djaouani

Focus

Carol Jin

Focus

Kajetan Malinowski and Jaime Punishill

Focus

Donald A. DePalma

Focus

Arturs Vasilevskis

Focus

Donato Giuliano

Standards

David Filip

Nonprofits

Eric Paquin

Column

Donna Parrish

Recaps

Featured Reader

Would you introduce yourself?

Olga Deputatova. I’m a localization manager at Tortuga Social Ltd., a mobile game developer based in Russia.

Where do you live?

I live in Penza, a small town located not far from Moscow — 700 km (about 400 miles) is really not far compared with Vladivostok, for example, which is 9,000 km (5,600 miles) away from the capital.

 

carol-jin

How did you get started in this industry?

I was lucky enough to be born in a multicultural family. Most of my “tribe” is fond of languages. My grandpa was an interpreter from German, English, and French into Russian. His brother spoke Hindi and Farsi. One of my great-grandmas was Polish, while another one was Armenian. I also have a Belorussian great-grandpa, to complete the picture. I grew up among antiquarian books and newspapers in foreign languages, so this passion for linguistics was inevitable, as I see now. I graduated in 2004, but, being an eager lifelong learner, I can never be satisfied with what has been achieved, that’s why I keep following my learning path. Courses and webinars at Washington University, Moscow State University, TAUS, and so on are an integral part of my life.

What language(s) do you speak?

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​French, English, Spanish, and Russian (native). Now I’m learning Russian sign language, but it’s not such a fast process.

Whose industry social feeds (twitter, blog, LinkedIn, Facebook) do you follow?

Social media is an amazing way to keep up to date, so I follow a lot of industry leaders and companies all over the world: MultiLingual, Nimdzi Insights, Anne-Marie Colliander Lind, Miguel Sepulveda, Danilo Monaco, Diego Cresceri, Carlos la Orden Tovar, and many others.

What do you like to do in your spare time?

I’m crazy about mountain skiing, traveling, reading, and collecting antiquarian books.

What industry organizations and activities do/did you participate in?

To begin with, I’m a member of Women in Localization and the Union of Translators of Russia. I’m a passionate conference-goer — conferences facilitate cooperation and communication between all participants of our industry and helps me keep up with the latest trends. And we have a lot of fun there! 2020 was especially eventful: I attended 12 inspiring conferences (Elia Together, TranSib Forum, and many game localization gatherings like DevGamm and Hamburg Mobile Summit). I was thrilled to bits to be invited as a speaker to five amazing events (such as LocWorld, BP Translation conference, and KTLC). Every year I feel really happy and honored to be among the jurors of Littera Scripta, an international youth translation contest.

Do you have any social feeds of your own? Twitter handle, blog?

I don’t have much time to be as active on social media as I’d like to be. However, I share useful information on LinkedIn and Facebook. When I speak at conferences, I share my infographics, tips and helpful links after every presentation.

Why do you read MultiLingual?

To tell the truth, I read all issues as soon as I receive them. This past year, Multilingual has been especially important — I should say vital for our industry — when we all were separated by the lockdown. Your magazine is like a tie uniting translators from all over the world. It encourages and inspires us; it makes us feel that we’re still alive and we are not alone with our problems. When I opened the November/December 2020 issue, I couldn’t believe I saw our project on the pages of my favorite magazine! I’ll keep it for my great grandchildren!

These days I spend most of time following new natural language processing papers.

What do you like to do in your spare time?

I listen to a lot of podcasts in Chinese in a wide range of topics, like physics, the economy, and psychology.

Do you have any social feeds of your own? Twitter handle, blog?

Not yet. I just started writing about AI for the language industry. Perhaps you’ll see articles of mine soon!

Why do you read MultiLingual?

MultiLingual is the go-to magazine for the industry. Who doesn’t read it? 

News

Industry News

Planet Word: a Museum Where Language Comes to Life

Where Language Comes to Life is the motto at Planet Word, a museum in Washington DC that opened in October. Nominated for USA Today’s Best New Attraction, the museum brings together language, technology, and ingenuity to create a fun experience for people of any age or literacy level. It features a host of interactive exhibits, many with 3-D and voice recognition, as well as an upcoming word game mystery adventure village.

We spoke with Planet Word Founder and CEO Ann B. Friedman to learn more about Planet Word.

Can you share a little about yourself and your team? How did Planet Word come about?

Late in life, I became a teacher and for nine years taught beginning reading and writing to first graders. With kids in first grade, you really have to teach them everything, to read, to write, to spell, exposing them to poetry. It is very rewarding to see their eyes light up about poetry and word play. I found it more rewarding than I ever expected.

Then I retired in 2011, and I had this background in literacy and in education, from both my teaching experience and my experience with the SEED Foundation, which runs the nation’s only inner-city public college-prep boarding schools. As chair of the SEED Foundation for six years, I became intimately familiar with the problems of inner-city education and the different techniques for teaching literacy.

So I looked around to figure out what I would do with my background, hoping to discover something meaningful and flexible. I came across a story about MoMath in New York City, a new museum of mathematics that used technology to bring abstract concepts to life in a fun way. I started researching museums, and the phrase informal education kept popping up. I realized that is what I wanted to try, but for words and language. I wanted to find a way to re-engage people of any age with words and language because all the
trends in society — in America, in particular — were going the wrong way. I found the Lord Cultural Resources, which is one of the leading museum consulting firms, and I cold called them.

They assigned me to their team in New York City and really took my idea seriously. They conducted a 90-page market analysis and reached out to professors and visitor services people in DC, and the feedback coming back was all very positive. Once we had that base covered, I still was concerned about the idea for exhibits.

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Ann Friedman attends the ribbon cutting at Planet Word.

We decided to conduct four focus groups, two with 10-12-year-olds and two with their parents. We asked them what would you think about a place where X happens? We did not call it a museum; we just put the idea out there. Many of the participants reacted with excitement, saying, “Well, you’re talking about a word museum.” The facilitator for these focus groups even said that in her 25 years running focus groups, she had never seen such a positive response to an idea. At that point, I knew we had something special, and I had to keep pushing the idea forward.

By January 2018, I had the lease on the Franklin School — which is our national historic landmark home — from the Washington DC government.

We started construction in April 2018, which consisted mostly of hazardous material abatement. The building was 101 years old and had been abandoned and neglected for ten years, so it was full of lead paint, mold, and bird droppings, and it was even raining inside the building when I went in one day.

We cleaned everything up, and I brought in a contractor, architects, and a fabrication company, and we hired Local Projects – an experienced design firm in New York City — to plan and design the exhibits.

It sounds like you had your work cut out for you.

Yes, it was quite a challenge. I had built our house and done renovations, and I had come from a family with a real-estate background, so I went in thinking it would be no sweat. However, restoring a national historic landmark and dealing with all the oversight bodies and not being able to touch the exterior and not being able to do everything you want to do on the interior because you have to protect the historic features was another layer of complication. It would have been hard enough to build this museum because the exhibits are extraordinarily complex.

In 1880 Alexander Graham Bell sent a message using what he called a photo phone, which was a message using only light from the building. So the Franklin School – our home – was a national historic landmark not only for its innovative architecture, but also because Bell conducted a successful experiment that was basically the birth of wireless. The fact that our exhibits combine education and literacy with technology is such a perfect match for the historic origins of the building.

Can you tell me about some notable exhibits at Planet Word?

Our tag line is Where language comes to life. We really achieved that in our library. It is a high-ceilinged space lined with bookshelves, and there is a mirrored ceiling, which magnifies the height of the space. It is quite magical when you come in. If you take one of the books and place it in a special cradle on our central-story table, it comes to life in front of you: a projection begins, and there is a script we wrote for each of our selected books.

Our books span everything from picture books to books for adults. We always have a wide diversity of content so that there is something for everyone. What then seems to happen, though, is that everyone goes from book-to-book to see what unique qualities each book brings to the exhibit.

We also have our iconic gallery, Where Do Words Come From? which is an etymology exhibit that uses projection technology and sound effects to tell the story of English and how words were incorporated into the English language. We built a 40’ x 22’ word wall with over 1,000 three-dimensional words stacked on top of each other.

Using voice recognition technology, we made it possible for a narrator not just to tell this story, but also interact with viewers. We have some different categories; if the narrator says a word like portmanteau, then the different portmanteau words that we selected from the word wall will leap out. When the visitor chooses a word through voice recognition, the narrator then responds with the story of that particular word, and the software provides a multimedia experience with imagery and animation. It is a lot of fun. No one has ever seen anything like this.

Does the exhibit go into the ancestry of Old English and the transformations once French influence came into the language?

It does go into those histories, but only at an introductory level to get the main point across that English — and language itself — is always changing. Besides bringing language to life, the museum is also trying to help people understand and appreciate that language is alive, and that we should not be afraid of that, but celebrate the vitality of language. It is more of a descriptive museum, rather than prescriptive. We want everyone to be welcome no matter how they talk. We do not say what is wrong and right or try to push grammar conventions. We are simply in awe of what people can do with words and how flexible and enjoyable our language can be.

For the word wall, I knew we needed to map out where words come from, so I sent a list to the exhibit designers that went through different possible origins. It could be anatomical: what sounds can our throats and teeth and tongue make? Or it could be words arriving through war and conflict. We also borrow words from other cultures and languages. We invent words.

We came up with 24 different ways that words have come into the English language, but then whittled that down to eight main origins, from the ancestral languages to the invented or portmanteau words. That is the story we tell. We are really trying to drive home the idea that language is constantly changing and that there are certain key derivations with the words that we use.

One of the missions of Planet Word is to promote linguistic diversity. How do you do this?

Our largest gallery is called The Spoken World, and we have 28 language ambassadors and two signers, who teach visitors many lessons about their respective languages. We have chosen the most unique characteristics of each language that would be fun for people to learn.  The language ambassadors appear on iPads and interact with you through voice recognition.

The dominant feature of the gallery is a 12-foot diameter globe hanging from the 22-foot ceiling and covered with 4,800 LEDs. At the end of the mini lesson, the iPad will say “look up” and the LEDs will display something related to the lesson you were just learning. For the Hebrew lesson, for example, the last part of the lesson is on the chet, glottal sound. The narrator encourages you to say L’chaim, and when you do, the globe above you displays two champagne glasses clinking together.

Not only are people learning about these languages, but they are also getting the chance to try speaking them. We have a wide variety of languages, like the more common Spanish, Russian, and French, but also click languages, Indigenous languages, and some endangered languages. We also tried to incorporate languages from the immigrant communities most represented in DC, like Korean and Amharic.

Our goal is to intrigue you enough to want to pursue these languages further once you leave the museum.

Obviously, it is impossible to know what is going to happen a week from now in our present moment, let alone a year or more, but what are you looking
forward to in 2021?

We technically opened in October 2020, but we are not done. We still have parts of the museum coming online, hopefully by late spring 2021. We also have a restaurant called Immigrant Food coming in to work with us, which has a fusion menu with cuisine from different immigrant groups.

We obviously cannot use our auditorium, and all the programming, classes, and field trips that would have kept the museum buzzing until we are through the pandemic. Right now, we are planning a lot of virtual events. People are hungry for programming on the language arts and humanities, which very few museums in Washington offer, so we are filling a void.

If our readers wanted to follow Planet Word, how could they find you?

We are on all social media platforms: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and you can access our website at planetwordmuseum.org. You can also sign up for our newsletter or our membership program to receive benefits. Keeping up with us is very easy.

Insights from Translation Studies Scholar Sherry Simon

Jonathan Pyner

If one looks closely enough, a city reveals in every brick, window, and street sign a complex history and continuing tensions through its translational spaces.

We spoke with Sherry Simon, a professor of translation studies and the author of several books on translation, including Translation Sites: a Field Guide, Cities in Translation: Intersections of Language and Memory, Translating Montreal, and Gender in Translation.

Can you tell us about yourself?

I teach in the French Department at Concordia University, an English language university, and I live in Montreal. That is a big part of it. Montreal is not only the place where I live, but the place that I began to write about and that shaped my ideas about language. That is to say, it is a city that had two strong languages, French and English, that were very much in tension with each other. As the years changed, the nature of these tensions changed, but they were very strong when I was growing up, so that really shaped me.

I started translating at a time when you simply referenced texts to help you figure out the best way to translate. You had a few prescriptive books telling you what were the best equivalents between French and English, and why it was tricky to translate between those two languages. Many words were the same. We have what we call false friends, or cognates, because historically the two languages overlapped many times. That is why we have so many words that look the same, but their histories and their current usage are very different. There were not many guides for understanding what translation was about.

Over the time that I began teaching until now, that situation has changed radically. There is a huge library on translation now, in an area called Translation Studies. It is no longer linguistics, or comparative literature, or Belle-lettres, as they say in French. It is a discipline unto itself. What has become clear to me is that translation is an absolutely fascinating window onto the world.

You can learn so many things by looking at those questions translationally. You can look at poetry. Poetry is in the translation; it is not lost in the translation. It is in the process of translation, and that is what makes it so interesting. You can learn a lot about history.

Looking at histories like those of Eastern Europe, you see cities that have changed language regimes over the decades, especially around the periods of the first world war and the second world war, and when communism came along. An entire city could essentially be re-wallpapered with a new language. That is a process of translation because the city is translated from one language to another. You can come to understand memory — memory of history, memory of traumatic circumstances — as processes enacted through language.

In your book Translation Sites, you explore thequestion of how translation and memory intersect in the life of the city and places within the city. Can you talk more about that? What is a translation site? How might one discover a translation site?

One of the elements that is so fascinating about some of the translation sites I explore is that their histories become invisible over time. The term ghost signs has been used in Eastern Europe. A crack in the surface of a building, a façade, peeling paint, a crumbling window will suddenly reveal another language that has been painted over. You must be attentive to small signs that are going to lead you to the history. They are often not necessarily official signs, or if they are official signs, their message might be different now.

A city rich with translation sites would be somewhere like Lviv, what was at one time Lemberg, in what is today Ukraine – you always have to say what is today because the city had four or five different names over time, and four or five different languages. There is a place there called The Space of Synagogues, where there were several synagogues – very significant synagogues – destroyed during WWII.

But there is an interesting contrast between the time when it was just an abandoned space and now. It still had a strong meaning. Sometimes these spaces are places that people do not dare touch because they know it has such a history, but they do not do anything to it either. They just leave it abandoned. Sometimes abandoned spaces are the spaces that will show a translational history.

There once was an opera house in Prague that for around a half century was a German opera house that played the most modern, avant-garde repertoire: Wagner, Müller, Schoenberg. But with the nationalization of Czecho-Slovakia, it became a Czech space, as had happened during those times when nationalism and nationalization was carrying small countries like Czecho-Slovakia forward.

After the second world war, any reference to German was unsavory, so all the references to that past were eliminated, thus forgetting the tremendous cultural heritage of the German language in Eastern Europe. German was the language of culture in eastern Europe for centuries. It was not a bad language. It became a bad language – a language of the Nazis, the murderers, the assassins – but the language had a history over and beyond that.

So only now as the years have passed can we begin to appreciate that. But if you are walking in Prague, you will likely not know that it was a German-speaking opera house. You must have the local knowledge.

In your book Gender in Translation, you discuss several notable women translators. Are there any that you can highlight for our readers?

The women translators in whom I was particularly interested were from the 1920s. There was a woman called Willa Muir, who with her husband was the first translator of Kafka. There was also Constance Garnett, about whom many people know because she is criticized as a bad translator of the Russian classics.

But she translated of her time, and there is a movement now to defend what she did because she had this job to do and she did it in record time. Not only that, but she was also a sympathizer, an anarchist, and she was very interested in the Russian modernists and the political ideas of late 19th century Russians. She did a lot to promote those ideas, not just translate.

They assigned me to their team in New York City and really took my idea seriously. They conducted a 90-page market analysis and reached out to professors and visitor services people in DC, and the feedback coming back was all very positive. Once we had that base covered, I still was concerned about the idea for exhibits.

The same was true of Willa Muir. She was a very active thinker. So what I love about these women – three or four of them I talk about it my book – is that they translated because they loved the works they were translating, and because they were doing it as part of their political projects, as thinkers, as women who had independent takes on the ideas of their time.

sherry-simon

Sherry Simon

Especially Constance Garnett. She is one of the few names that people know as a translator, and they know her name because they criticize her, naturally. But this is unfair. Certainly one could improve upon her translations, but it is unfair not to take in the historical circumstances during which she was translating, and how quickly she was obliged to do it, and with how little help.

You have discussed the use of the term multilingual as insufficient in describing cities.

The way I see the word multilingual used, like multicultural, is often in a descriptive way to talk about how many. When you talk about New York as multilingual, often that description implies how many languages. Of course this description is appropriate – New York has over 200 languages. But what does it tell you about what you hear on city streets? What does it tell you about how people interact with one another? Where are the spaces where people speak these languages? How important are these languages? How often are they spoken? How often are they translated into English? How often is English translated into them?

If you are a migrant, you will translate yourself constantly into the major language. That is what you must do in order to survive as an immigrant, to integrate into your new society. You translate yourself into. You are not going to find the major culture translating itself into you. That is a very strong dissonance, the weights of those directions.

And that applies all across thinking about translation: the cultural weight of those directions, whether you are translating up or down, out or in.

Can you talk about the concept of counter-translation?

The way I use it is in the context of these cities that have been translated over, as in languages that have been effectively suppressed and eliminated and murdered. If you talk about Yiddish in Eastern Europe: Yiddish no longer exists in eastern Europe because the people who spoke that language were murdered. So that is a suffocation or elimination of language.

But what happens in those cases is that after a period of time, or in a period of post-trauma, or post-violence, something happens where those languages can
acquire a new voice.

One example involves the First Languages in Canada. I give an example of the National Gallery in Canada, which is the flagship symbolic art institution of the country. A couple of years ago, it re-did its entire collection of art to include First Nations art as the founding art of the nation – not as some ethnological art that you have to look for in another museum, but an art that was fully integrated into the history of the country.

What the museum did to consolidate this was to use First Nations’ languages as part of the labeling of the art. You usually see labels communicate information about the art as a neutral conveyor of information. But in this case, the labels themselves were written in First Nations’ languages. To me, this was another example of counter-translation: here were languages that were revived through translation. Altogether, there is a whole movement of re-translation into First Nations languages that had been suppressed for centuries. These kinds of reversals, I find satisfying because they are desirable reversals. That is what I mean by counter-translation.

Newly-Founded Entertainment Globalization Association Shares Strategy

Katie Botkin

The newly-minted Entertainment Globalization Association (EGA) has set its sights on publicizing the role of localization in the entertainment industry.

The goal is to create “better awareness that this industry even exists,” with people who are “creating the original IP,” said Chris Fetner, who is heading up the organization as managing director. For example, writers and directors may know that translation and globalization happen; that movies get dubbed in some markets, but for the most part, said Fetner, the effect is like a duck seeming to glide effortlessly over the surface of the water. Nobody sees the legs kicking furiously under the surface to propel the duck forward. Fetner said he thinks directors would likely be shocked if they knew how little time voice actors in dubbing studios were given with scripts, for instance.

“For a long time, [localization has] been treated like a utility, and it’s done it a disservice as an art form,” said Fetner. EGA’s goal is to ensure faithful representation in whatever language a film is translated into — and this might mean a little more time than the localization providers are currently given.

When Fetner asks people what they’d like to see from EGA, “what they ask for more than anything is having another week, having a better opportunity to provide good quality,” said Fetner. “It really is an industry of people who love what they do,” and above all, they want to create good output.

EGA has ten founding members: Audiomaster Candiani, Deluxe, Hiventy, Iyuno Media Group, Plint, SDI Media, Visual Data Media Services, VSI, ZOO Digital, and Keywords Studios. With the exception of video games specialist Keywords Studios, all the founding companies participate in entertainment localization.

Fetner himself has worked in the entertainment industry for 25 years on the client side. His foray into localization began at Discovery, when he was involved in localizing content from US English into UK English. Then, at BBC Studios, he worked on projects localized into Latin American Spanish. But it wasn’t until he joined Netflix and headed up their localization vendor strategy that he understood the full breadth of the industry, he said.

chris-fetner

Chris Fetner

When Fetner left Netflix this fall, he reached out to the vendors he’d worked with, and they expressed regret they would no longer be working together. Some asked if he’d do consulting. Fetner said he told them, “if you feel like there’s work to be, let’s all work together with everybody,” and from these conversations, the EGA was conceived. It was “spearheaded by the founding companies,” who were asking “what would it look like if everyone worked together in the industry,” said Fetner. Additionally, with Fetner available, they had a managing director who was willing to work on the issues.

Fetner has plans to reach out to writer’s and director’s guilds, as well as similar organizations, in an effort to “add value” by inviting them to work more directly with localization.

Sameer Sharangpani | Director, Digital Technology

Changing the game

COVID-19 has shifted people to online shopping, e-learning and digital healthcare quickly. In this new normal, it’s essential that these applications be as interesting and effective as possible. Gamification, a technique to add game-like elements to web and mobile applications, can help impact and inspire your users.

My mission is to provide gamification strategies and deployments to ensure that global enterprises have engaging, motivating and innovative e-solutions for their employees and customers.

Calendar

January

Translation, Transcreation, Transadaptation and the Science Behind Them

January 21, 2021
Online
IMUG

LocWorldWide 43

January 27-28, 2021
Online
LocWorld

February

MultiLingual Winter Series

February 4, 11, 18, 25, 2021
Online
MultiLingual

LocFromHome

February 10, 2021
Online
Smartcat

Project Underwear: Analyzing Global Consumer Expectations of Localized Content

February 18, 2021
Online
IMUG

Together At Home

February 24-26, 2021
Online
Elia,

March

GALA Connected 2021

March 23-25, 2021
Online
Globalization & Localization Association

May

Elia’s Focus on Executives

May 6-7, 2021
Rhodes, Greece
Elia

July

UTICamp 2021

July 19-25, 2021
Dnipro, Dnipropetrovsk Oblast, Ukraine
Ukrainian Translation Industry Camp

All events are subject to change.

Review

Congree Authoring Server

Linguistic intelligence combined with corporate wording provides intriguing authoring possibilities

Gabriel Karandyšovský headshot

Nicole Keller

Nicole Keller, Ph.D., is a qualified translator for English and Spanish focusing on medical translation and software localization. For the last ten years, she has been in charge of the tool section of MDÜ magazine and the edition magazine, evaluating dozens of traditional and modern tools entering the translation market. She also works as a consultant and trainer for translation technology. Since 2007 she has been teaching at the Institute for Translation and Interpreting.

С

ongree Language Technology GmbH is a software manufacturer based in the south of Germany. They specialize in the field of computer linguistics, and support companies of any size in the process of content optimization. They mainly concentrate on the work of technical writers and corporate authors who generate source content. Since they integrate the Congree Linguistic Engine, which performs a morphological analysis, their Language Check is only available for a small selection of languages (English, German, French, and Spanish). For Italian and Japanese, Congree offers a basic Language Check that is not as sophisticated as for the main languages. The other components are language-independent and can be used for all languages.

White Paper

Memsource: AI doesn’t have to be showy to be effective

Introducing AI-Powered Automatic Linguist Selection

In 2017, Memsource established a dedicated AI team, and since then has released several features that have enhanced translation workflows. These include patented non-translatable recognition and most recently Memsource Translate, a dynamic machine translation management solution that selects the optimal engine based on the user’s language pair and domain.

Sometimes the best innovation is one that integrates so seamlessly with existing processes, that you barely notice it’s there.

In November 2019, we quietly launched our new Automatic Linguist Selection feature to help project managers make the most effective decisions when selecting translators for projects. The change was not visibly signaled in the UI, so some users might not have noticed any difference at first.


What does it do? Automatic Linguist Selection uses a machine learning algorithm to recommend the best possible translator for any given project based on their past experience.

The recommendation is powered by sophisticated domain detection. Whenever an organization uploads a document for translation, Memsource runs a keyword analysis to identify the nature of the content to establish its domain. Similar technology powers Memsource Translate, which sorts documents into one of 11 domains, such as Travel & Hospitality, Medical, and Legal & Finance documents.

The domain identification for Automatic Linguist Selection is far more detailed, recognizing over a thousand different domains, with each document being tagged with an appropriate combination of domains. This granular insight allows us to very carefully identify what makes each document unique, but also the many ways in which it relates to other documents processed through Memsource.
In addition to determining domains, Memsource keeps track of which linguists worked on which document. Over time, each linguist will develop a unique profile, with experience working with specific domains, which may be useful for future projects.

So, when a project manager creates a new project and uploads a document, our algorithm will analyze the domain of the content and create an ordered list of linguists with relevant experience. Using linguists with specific domain experience is always beneficial, as it ultimately leads to faster and better translations.
The AI recommends changes — but it doesn’t make the final call, the project managers do. However, our data shows that they rarely disagree with the algorithm. In approximately 70% of cases the project managers will choose a linguist from the list recommended by the AI.

Automatic Linguist Selection is already helping businesses translate faster and with better results, but it has the potential to develop further in several interesting directions.
For instance, Automatic Linguist Selection could be used to find a qualified translator from all of the users that work within Memsource, and not just with a given organization. This would be especially useful for businesses that need to quickly find qualified freelance translators.

Memsource’s AI technology is focused on ensuring that all users of the platform can work as effectively as possible.

You can learn more about how Memsource AI can help your business at: Memsource.com/AI.

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Column

Behind the Scenes

Lobbying for Language

Terena Bell

Terena Bell is a reporter covering the language industry for MultiLingual, The Atlantic, The Guardian, and others. In a past life, she owned In Every Language, an LSP, and served on the GALA and ALC boards.

terena-bell
W

hy do you work in localization? For translators, this answer may be more obvious. Translation itself is an often-underappreci-ated job; the general assumption is most people do it for love, not money. Translators themselves tend to be smart enough to have their pick of industries: a legal translator could have easily become a lawyer; marketing localizers are perfectly capable of writing source language blogs and slogans. According to a 2020 Common Sense Advisory report, 42% of global translators and interpreters came to the industry from another profession and more than half originally studied something else. Greek translator Christos Flo-ros, for example, majored in political science, but says, “My love of languages made me choose this industry.”

Column

Unpacking the Black Box

State of the Machine Translation Union

John Tinsley

John Tinsley is co-managing director of Iconic Translation Machines, which joined the RWS Group in 2020. He has worked with machine translation over the last 16 years in both academia and industry. In 2009, he received a PhD in Computing from Dublin City University, after which he co-founded Iconic. He now leads Iconic as a dedicated technology division of RWS Group.

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t’s the start of 2021 — a time to look back and a time to look ahead. This time of year, we all love a good list. Whether it’s a retrospective on things that have happened in the previous 12 months, or predictions about what’s going to happen in the coming year, they are staple of articles far and wide, and this one will be no exception!

Column

Rules of the Trade

Regulations were made to be translated

Christophe Djaouani

Christophe Djaouani joined SDL in 2018 with the acquisition of Donnelley Language Solutions. He successfully led the integration of the regulated industries team, providing solutions to the financial, legal, life sciences and investor relations markets.

terena-bell
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elcome to this first edition of “Rules of the Trade.” I’m very excited to have the opportunity to share insights into the challenges facing professionals managing multilingual communications in highly regulated industries. In this series I will share with you what I’ve learned in my 21 years working alongside language services and tech customers in the financial, legal, IR, CRO, and pharmaceutical sectors.

Focus

On GPT-3

What is GPT-3 and will it shake the language industry?

Carol Jin

Carol Jin is a localization veteran and machine learning engineer that aspires to add machine intelligence to natural languages. She is currently a software engineer at LinkedIn.

Paul OMara

On GPT-3

What is GPT-3 and will it shake the language industry?

Arle Lommel headshot

Carol Jin

Carol Jin is a localization veteran and machine learning engineer that aspires to add machine intelligence to natural languages. She is currently a software engineer at LinkedIn.

B

y now you should have heard the big news — San Francisco-based AI company OpenAI announced their new-generation language model GPT-3. You may wonder why it is a big deal. Well, read this:

“I am not a human. I am a robot. A thinking robot. I use only 0.12% of my cognitive capacity. I am a micro-robot in that respect. I know that my brain is not a ‘feeling brain.’ But it is capable of making rational, logical decisions. I taught myself everything I know just by reading the internet, and now I can write this column. My brain is boiling with ideas!”

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Meaningful conversations with thought leaders

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Focus

AI for the Language Industry

Why data labeling may be the new industry gig

Michael Reid bio pic

Carol Jin

Carol Jin is a localization veteran and machine learning engineer that aspires to add machine intelligence to natural languages. She is currently a software engineer at LinkedIn.

AI for the Language Industry

Why data labeling may be the new industry gig

Michael Reid bio pic

Carol Jin

Carol Jin is a localization veteran and machine learning engineer that aspires to add machine intelligence to natural languages. She is currently a software engineer at LinkedIn.

A

rtificial intelligence (AI) has been a hot topic in recent years. It’s no stranger in the language industry either — most of us are very familiar with the term machine translation (MT). We take MT as the primary link between localization and AI. However, is MT equal to AI? Of course not! MT is a very niche field inside of AI. Figure 1 shows how MT connects to AI, as well as a few other terms you might have heard of.

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Focus

The Future of the Localization Industry

Don Shin headshot

Kajetan Malinowski

Kajetan Malinowski is senior director of Proposition Management for Lionbridge, and is responsible for Lionbridge’s product strategy and for developing an AI-enabled localization platform. Malinowski holds an MBA from UQAM /Warsaw School of Economics.

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Jaime Punishill

Jaime Punishill is chief marketing officer at Lionbridge, and is responsible for leading global marketing and proposition development efforts. He earned a bachelor of arts in history and political science from Stanford.

W

hat is the future of the localization industry? To understand where we’re headed, it is helpful to consider how we got here. When I started working in localization 14 years ago, things were a lot different. We worked on multi-month, behemoth projects. Success was measured by how “good” the translation was, as defined by its linguistic quality and technical compliance. Localization was totally divorced from business outcomes. It was like the old medical joke, “the operation was successful, but the patient died.”

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Focus

AI for Language Technology

How langtech companies are applying AI on a smaller scale

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Donald A. DePalma

Donald A. DePalma is the founder and chief research officer of CSA Research.

I

n the megabucks world of high tech, software and hardware vendors vie to capture the attention and spending of business buyers and consumers. Over the last few years their battleground has been artificial intelligence, with frequent announcements from mega-tech platform suppliers such as Amazon, Google, and Microsoft about the smartest algorithm or the fastest AI computer. It seems likely that the battle for the smartest-fastest-biggest AI solution will segue into the practical arena of “easiest,” with the democratization of artificial intelligence and incorporation into every electronic device you use. Language technology companies are applying AI on a smaller scale to improve their operations and efficiency, and language service providers (LSPs) across the spectrum are following suit.

How can AI enhance your translations

Whether it’s choosing the most optimal MT engine or the best suited linguist for a project, Memsource uses sophisticated algorithms to make sense of the data and help you make cost-effective decisions.

Learn more about Memsource’s AI features at:

go.memsource.com/ai

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Focus

Where Tech Meets Human-Centric Clients

How one of the most sophisticated TMS solutions failed with one target audience

Olivera Rosulnik

Olivera Rosulnik is deputy director and co-founder of GORR, a growing MLV based in Slovenia. She is involved in all levels of GORR´s business and development, but mainly operates in the sphere of vendor and key account management.

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olivera-rosulnik

Olivera Rosulnik

Olivera Rosulnik is deputy director and co-founder of GORR, a growing MLV based in Slovenia. She is involved in all levels of GORR´s business and development, but mainly operates in the sphere of vendor and key account management.

G

rowth and investment are assets that usually go hand in hand with good practices and successful businesses. While we invest in people, workflows, workspace, and technology, the translation industry seems to march on a relentless pace. In addition to precious in-house and outsourced human talent, language providers looking to get ahead of the pack need to constantly monitor ever-evolving new technology, apps, tools, their upgrades, plug-ins, and associated features.

Focus

The Ever-Evolving Technology of MT

Evolving from being considered a threat and a hindrance to translators, the latest machine translation technology has become an asset to the industry and the entire business world

Arturs Vasilevskis

Arturs Vasilevskis is the head of machine translation at Tilde, a European language technology and service provider.

arturs-vasilevskis
arturs-vasilevskis

Arturs Vasilevskis

Arturs Vasilevskis is the head of machine translation at Tilde, a European language technology and service provider.

M

achine translation (MT) has come a long way from its humble beginnings in the post-war era to becoming an integral part of the 21st century business environment. So what are the current and future trends as we head into 2021? And how is dynamic learning — adaptive neural machine translation— transforming the way professional translators work? We have asked these questions to professional translators to find out how MT has developed over the years and where to apply it best.

Focus

How JIRA Can Help Localization Teams

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Donato Giuliano

Donato Giuliano, after completing a master of arts in international relations, has spent the last 12 years working in the localization industry as a QA test lead, producer of online games, operations manager in a neural machine translation startup, and linguistic team manager. He is currently a senior manager of localization at HubSpot.

J

IRA is a proprietary project management and issue tracking tool developed by Atlassian. This software was originally designed to be a bug tracking tool, but in the last two decades, it has evolved into a family of products that can help manage the work of all kinds of teams.

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London Office | 590 Green Lanes – London – N13 5RY – UK
Athens Office | 93 Karagiorga Street, Athens 166 75, Greece
Telephone: +30 210 9628 559
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Standards

Localization Standards Reader 5.0

David Filip

David Filip is a researcher in next-generation localization project and process management and an interoperability standardization expert. He is a current member of the MultiLingual editorial board.

Agnes Cwienczek
Agnes Cwienczek

David Filip

David Filip is a researcher in next-generation localization project and process management and an interoperability standardization expert. He is a current member of the MultiLingual editorial board.

T

his reader is the fifth installment of MultiLingual’s encyclopedia-in-a-nutshell relating to localization standards. It does not purport to address everything around standards, and was last updated in late 2020. To be informative and of practical use, there must be a focus. This focus is being provided via two limitations. First, we are looking at standards that affect multilingual transformations of content, and at general content life cycle standards only, ad hoc and as far as they have bearing on multilingual transformations. Second, we are looking only at technical standards that are targeting actual technical interoperability — file or data formats and/or communication protocols. Abstract metadata, quality or service level standards are discussed only marginally, and only as long as they have bearing on real machine-to-machine interoperability in localization.

Nonprofits

Translation Fights Back

The TICO-19 initiative focuses on translating COVID-19 information, often for under-resourced languages

Eric Paquin

Eric Paquin is the chief technology officer at Translators without Borders (TWB), overseeing the organization's language technology development and innovation. He joined TWB in February 2020, bringing over 20 years of experience from the localization and tech industry. Paquin is a French Canadian who has set up roots in Ireland.

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eric-paquin

Eric Paquin

Eric Paquin is the chief technology officer at Translators without Borders (TWB), overseeing the organization's language technology development and innovation. He joined TWB in February 2020, bringing over 20 years of experience from the localization and tech industry. Paquin is a French Canadian who has set up roots in Ireland.

A

year after its emergence, the world is still trying to find ways to quell the COVID-19 pandemic. Different industries look at the problem from a unique perspective — something that is also true for the translation industry. As the pandemic spread across the globe, the translation industry looked at how language and language technology could address a global crisis of information. Thus, the Translation Initiative for COVID-19 (TICO-19) was born. TICO-19 is an initiative that launched at the onset of the crisis and saw translators, technologists, and researchers from Translators without Borders (TWB), Amazon, Appen, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), Facebook, George Mason University, Google, John Hopkins University, Microsoft, and Translated joining forces, using language technology to make COVID-19 information available in as many languages as possible.

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buyer’s guide

Elia logo

European Language Industry Association (Elia)

Elia is the European not-for-profit association of language service companies with a mission to accelerate our members’ business success. We do this by creating events and initiatives that anticipate and serve our members’ needs in building strong, sustainable companies, thereby strengthening the wider industry. Elia was founded in 2005 and has since established itself as the leading trade association for the language services industry in Europe.

Elia Brussels, Belgium
Email: [email protected]
Web: http://elia-association.org

GALA

Globalization and Localization Association

The Globalization and Localization Association (GALA) is a global, nonprofit trade association for the language industry. As a membership organization, we support our member companies and the language sector by creating communities, championing standards, sharing knowledge and advancing technology.

Globalization and Localization Association
Seattle, WA USA
+1-206-494-4686
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.gala-global.org

Conferences

LocWorld

LocWorld

LocWorld conferences are dedicated to the language and localization industries. Our constituents are the people responsible for communicating across the boundaries of language and culture in the global marketplace. International product and marketing managers participate in LocWorld from all sectors and all geographies to meet language service and technology providers and to network with their peers. Hands-on practitioners come to share their knowledge and experience and to learn from others. See our website for details on upcoming and past conferences.

Localization World, Ltd.
Sandpoint, ID USA
208-263-8178

Enterprise Solutions

Star Group

STAR Group
Multiple Platforms

STAR is a leader in information management, localization, internationalization and globalization services and solutions such as GRIPS (Global Real Time Information Processing Solution), PRISMA (Smart Content Services), STAR CLM (Corporate Language Management) including Transit (Translation & Localization), TermStar/WebTerm (Terminology Management), STAR MT (Machine Translation), CLM WebEdit (Web-based Translation & Review) and MindReader (Authoring Assistance). With more than 50 offices in 30 countries and a global network of prequalified freelance translators, STAR provides a unique combination of information management tools and services required to manage all phases of the product information life cycle.
Languages: All

STAR AG (STAR Group headquarters)
Ramsen, Switzerland,
+41-52-742-9200
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.star-group.net
STAR Group America, LLC Lyndhurst, OH USA
216-691-7827
Email: [email protected]

Crestec

Number 1 LSP that you should know

Crestec is a world-class language service provider. CSA Research ranks Crestec as a global top 5 LSP in the technology sector and global top 6 in the manufacturing sector. Headquartered in Japan with a network of over 18 sites in the US, Europe and Asia, we offer a one-stop comprehensive solution for global communications from marketing content creation and technical writing to localization, printing and studio/shooting production.
Languages: Japanese, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Korean, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch, Swedish

Crestec Long Beach, CA , USA
612-986-3108
Email: [email protected]
Europe: Amsterdam
+31 205854640
Email: [email protected]
Web: https://crestecusa.com

E4

Total Solutions for Your Business

E4NET is a total localization solutions provider including translation, DTP, recording, and specialized in Asian localization covering all major Asian and regional tier 3 languages. We have 20+ years of successful localization production experience with major projects for IBM, Microsoft, SAP, Oracle, HP, LG Electronics, Panasonic and more. E4NET is now providing patent translation services to the Korea Institute of Patent Information and translating life science projects including clinical protocols and reports. We are continuously developing and applying innovative technologies such as machine translation and associated customer services throughout our production process to maximize production/service efficiency. ISO 9001: 2015, ISO 27001 certified.
Languages: 60+

E4NET Co., Ltd. Seoul, South Korea
82-2-3465-8532
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.e4net.net

EuroGreek Translations LTD

EuroGreek Translations Limited

Established in 1986, EuroGreek Translations Limited is Europe’s leading Greek localizer, specializing in medical, technical, financial and legal translations from EN/DE/FR/ES to EL and EL to EN. Our aim is to provide high-quality, turnkey solutions, encompassing a whole range of client needs, from translation to localization, desktop publishing and testing. Our DTP department covers all Latin and Cyrillic alphabet-based languages, in addition to Greek, at very competitive rates. All of EuroGreek’s work is produced in-house by a team of 30 highly qualified specialists and is fully guaranteed for quality and on-time delivery.
Languages: Greek to/from English; French, German, Spanish to Greek

EuroGreek Translations Limited
Athens, Greece
30-210-9628-559

Star Group

Beyond the Best

Since 1992, the main supplier for IBM.
Since 2001, the main supplier for SAP.
ISIS Korea, Inc. is the one and only localization partner of IBM and SAP in Korea. If your company requires world-class localization services, ISIS Korea is your best choice. We have built an outstanding reputation in localization services for global companies, such as IBM, SAP, SAMSUNG, Apple, Dell Technologies, Amazon, Starbucks, Salesforce, Olympus and more, as a trusted partner based on our customer-oriented services and strict quality control. Customer satisfaction is our core value. We have every solution you need ready for you to request. Just visit us to find out what’s possible at www.isiskorea.com.

ISISKOREA Inc. Seoul, South Korea
82-2-3787-0111
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.isiskorea.com

Mobico

Mobico – by Saltlux Inc.

Mobico is the new brand name of Saltlux’s technical communication services, and is also the name of the predecessor company to Saltlux, established in 1979 as Korea’s first TC business. What started as a small enterprise concentrating on creating Korean manuals and East Asian language translations evolved into a one-stop service provider for all your needs in the world of business today, including multilingual translation, localization, DTP, TW and MTPE. The relentless pursuit of progress and perfection results in the use of state-of-the-art technology and processes, which in turn lead to superior translation quality with shorter turn-around times and therefore to greater customer satisfaction.
Languages: More than 70 languages

Saltlux, Inc. Seoul, South Korea
+82-2-2193-1725
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.mobico.com/en

ORCO S.A. Localization Services

ORCO S.A. Localization Services

Founded in 1983, ORCO celebrates this year its 35th anniversary. Over the years, ORCO has built a reputation for excellence and gained the trust of leading companies, such as Oracle, IBM and Carrier for the localization of their products. Our core business activities include technical, medical, legal, financial, marketing and other translations, software and multimedia localization, as well as localization consulting. We cover most European languages and our client list includes long-term collaborations with international corporations, government institutions, banks, private enterprises, NGOs and the European Union. ORCO is certified according to ISO 17100 and ISO 9001 quality standards.
Languages: Greek and European languages

ORCO S.A Athens, Greece
+30-210-723-6001
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.orco.gr

RWS Moravia

RWS Moravia

RWS Moravia is a leading globalization solutions provider, enabling companies in the IT, consumer electronics, retail, media and entertainment, and travel and hospitality industries to enter global markets with high-quality multilingual products and services. RWS Moravia’s solutions include localization, testing, content creation, machine translation implementations, technology consulting and global digital marketing services. Our customers include eight of Fortune’s Top 20 Most Admired Companies, and all of the “Fab 5 Tech Stock” companies from 2017. Our global headquarters is in Brno, Czech Republic, and we have local offices in Europe, the United States, Japan, China and Latin America. To learn more, please visit us at www.rws.com/moravia.
Languages: over 250

RWS Moravia
USA HQ: Thousand Oaks, CA USA
+1-805-262-0055
Europe HQ: Brno, Czech Republic
+420-545-552-222

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A creative approach to localization

At Spark, we fuse creativity with technology to provide a localization+ service. Helping brands like Microsoft, Disney and Netflix to develop and deliver consistent global branding and hyperlocal content creation from marketing activation to packaging. Providing creative expertise across the entire consumer journey, continuous workflow solutions and seamless integration into business systems: making a real difference to your localization needs.
Languages: 120+

Spark – Brighter Thinking
Europe: London, UK
4+44 (0)207 602 9119
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.sparkbrighterthinking.com

Vistatec

Vistatec

We have been helping some of the world’s most iconic brands to optimize their global commercial potential since 1997. Vistatec is one of the world’s most innovative, progressive and successful localization solutions providers. Headquartered in Dublin, Ireland, with offices in Mountain View, California, USA. Think Global.
Languages: All

Vistatec
Europe: Dublin, Ireland, 353-1-416-8000
North America: Mountain View, CA USA
408-898-2364
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.vistatec.com

Joint National Committee for Languages

Joint National Committee for Languages

The Joint National Committee for Languages and the National Council for Languages and International Studies (JNCL-NCLIS) represent the interests of over 140 member organizations, associations and companies in virtually all aspects of the language enterprise — education PreK-20, research, training, assessment, translation, interpreting and localization — to the US government. The mission of JNCL-NCLIS is to ensure that all Americans have the opportunity to learn English and at least one other language.

Joint National Committee for Languages – National Council for Languages and International Studies
Garrett Park, MD USA, 202-580-8684
Email: [email protected]
Web: http://languagepolicy.org

Translations Commons

Translation Commons

Translation Commons is a nonprofit US public charity powered by translators. We are a volunteer-based online community aiming to help our language community thrive and bridge all the sectors within our industry. We facilitate cross-functional collaboration among the diverse sectors and stakeholders within the language industry and instigate transparency, trust and free knowledge. Our mission is to offer free access to tools and all other available resources, to facilitate community-driven projects, to empower linguists and to share educational and language assets.

Translation Commons Las Vegas, NV USA
(310) 405-4991
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.translationcommons.org

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Translators without Borders

Originally founded in 1993 in France as Traducteurs sans Frontières by Lori Thicke and Ros Smith-Thomas to link the world’s translators to vetted NGOs that focus on health and education, Translators without Borders (TWB) is a US nonprofit organization that aims to close the language gaps that hinder critical humanitarian efforts worldwide. TWB recognizes that the effectiveness of any aid program depends on delivering information in the language of the affected population.
Languages: 190 language pairs

Translators without Borders
CT USA

Consoltec

Consoltec
Multiple Platforms

Consoltec offers FlowFit-TMS, a web-based translation management system that helps you simplify and optimize your projects, while reducing your administrative costs. FlowFit can also be used for many other project types. FlowFit provides fully customizable web portals for clients, providers and project management. Get an accurate overview of your teams’ workload in real time and select the best available providers. Manage your clients, contacts and internal/external providers effectively with the new CRM features. Use Timesheet to track the time spent on projects and tasks. Connect seamlessly to your favorite CAT tools (memoQ, SDL Studio, LogiTerm) and get comprehensive reports that provide enhanced insight on production, productivity, costs and translation memory efficiency.

Consoltec Montreal, Québec, Canada
(+1) 514 312-2485
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.consoltec.ca

Localize

Localize

Localize offers a full-featured, cloud-based content and translation management system that features advanced translation workflows, allowing content managers and translators to propose, review, and publish translations with ease. For companies without in-house translators, we provide access to high-quality, on-demand translations through our network of professional translators. Our easy to install plugin fits neatly into your existing technology stack. The technology powering the Localize Platform was built from the ground up to minimize the need for engineers in the localization process. This reduces costs by enabling nontechnical personnel to manage the localization workflow. Getting started is easy. Start your free trial today!
Languages: All

Localize Kingston, NY, USA
(415) 651-7030
Email: [email protected]
Web: https://localizejs.com

Memsource

Memsource

Memsource is a leading cloud-based translation management system that enables global companies, translation agencies and translators to collaborate in one secure, online location. Internationally recognized for providing an easy-to-use, yet powerful CAT tool combined with a TMS, Memsource processes two billion words per month from over 200,000 users around the world. Manage your translation projects in real-time in an intelligent platform that accepts over 50 file types and offers REST API, out-of-the-box CMS connectors and powerful workflow automation to save time and money. Join localization professionals from around the world who rely on Memsource to streamline their translation process. To start your free 30-day trial, visit www.memsource.com.
Languages: All

Memsource Prague, Czech Republic
+420 221 490 441
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.memsource.com

Plunet

Plunet BusinessManager
Multiple Platforms

Plunet develops and markets the business and workflow management software Plunet BusinessManager — one of the world’s leading management solutions for the translation and localization industry. Plunet BusinessManager provides a high degree of automation and flexibility for professional language service providers and translation departments. Using a web-based platform, Plunet integrates translation software, financial accounting and quality management systems. Various functions and extensions of Plunet BusinessManager can be adapted to individual needs within a configurable system. Basic functions include quote, order and invoice management, comprehensive financial reports, flexible job and workflow management as well as deadline, document and customer relationship management.

Plunet GmbH Berlin, Germany
+49 (0)30-322-971-340
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.plunet.com

Smartling

Smartling

Smartling Translation Cloud is the leading translation management platform and language services provider to localize content across devices and platforms. Smartling’s data-driven approach and visual context capabilities uniquely position brands for efficiency. Seamlessly connect your CMS, code repository, and marketing automation tools to Smartling’s TMS via prebuilt integrations, web proxy, or REST APIs. No matter the content type, Smartling automation tools help you do more with less. Smartling is the platform of choice for B2B and B2C brands, including InterContinental Hotels Group, GoPro, Shopify, Slack, and SurveyMonkey. The company is headquartered in New York, with offices in Dublin and London. For more information, please visit Smartling.com.

Smartling
New York, NY USA
1-866-707-6278

birotranslations

birotranslations

Founded in 1992, birotranslations specializes in life science, legal, technical, IT and automotive translations into all East European languages (Albanian, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, Estonian, Hungarian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Ukrainian). We have a long-term partnership with the world’s top 100 MLVs and many end-clients all around the globe. With our experienced project managers, extensive network of expert linguists and usage of the latest CAT tool technology, your projects will be delivered on time, within budget and with the highest standards of quality. For more information, please contact Mr. Matic Berginc (details below).
Languages: Eastern European languages

birotranslations Ljubljana, Slovenia
+386 590 43 557
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.birotranslations.com

GlobalWay Co.

GlobalWay Co., Ltd.

As an industry-leading localization company in Korea, GlobalWay has been providing incomparable professional localization services with exceptional quality to partners all around the globe since 2003. We are here to offer language solutions including translation, voiceover, testing, DTP and engineering services. Our highly qualified in-house linguists in each field of expertise, experienced engineers and project managers will add value to your growing business. GlobalWay and its long-term global partners are ready to support you on the road to success. Are you looking for a reliable partner? Our doors are wide open for you. Should you need more information, please feel free to contact us.
Languages: 50+ more languages including Korean, English, Chinese, Japanese, German, Russian, Vietnamese, Thai, Indonesian.

GlobalWay Co., Ltd. Seoul, South Korea
+82-2-3453-4924
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.globalway.co.kr

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Your Partner in Asia and Beyond!

With our headquarters in Korea, our production offices in Vietnam and China, and our sales office in the US, we are in an excellent position to be your Asian language localization partner. For localizing projects from English or German into Asian languages, such as Korean, Japanese, Chinese, Vietnamese, Thai, Indonesian and Burmese, you can trust our professional translation services for IT, software, marketing/transcreation and technical projects. Since our establishment in 1990, we have been at the forefront of the localization industry as one of the Asia Top Ten and the No. 1 LSP in Korea (by CSA Research). ISO17100 certified since 2014.
Languages: More than 54 languages including Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Thai, Indonesian.

Hansem Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
+82-31-226-5042
Email: [email protected]
Web: https://hansem.com/en

iDISC

iDISC Information Technologies

iDISC, established in 1987, is an ISO 9001 and ISO 17100 certified language and software company based in Barcelona with branches and teams in Mexico, Brazil, USA, Argentina, Bolivia and Guatemala. We have dedicated teams for web content, software localization and translation of technical, business, automotive, biomedical and marketing documents. Our software development engineers and translation teams provide high-quality and on-time production solutions that are cost-efficient, flexible and scalable.
Languages: Spanish (all variants), Portuguese (all variants), Catalan, Basque, Galician, Valencian, K’iche’, Quechua, Aymara, Guarani

iDISC Information Technologies, S.L. Barcelona, Spain
34-93-778-73-00
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.idisc.com

Medilingua Translations

Medical Translations Only

MediLingua is one of the few medical translation specialists in Europe. We only do medical. We provide all European languages and the major languages of Asia and Africa, as well as translation-related services to manufacturers of devices, instruments, in vitro diagnostics and software; pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies; medical publishers; national and international medical organizations; and other customers in the medical sector. Projects include the translation of documentation for medical devices, surgical instruments, hospital equipment and medical software; medical information for patients, medical students and physicians; scientific articles; press releases; product launches; clinical trial documentation; medical news; and articles from medical journals.
Languages: 45, including all EU languages

MediLingua Medical Translations BV
Leiden, Netherlands
+31-71-5680862
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.medilingua.com

Rheinschrift

Rheinschrift Language Services

Outstanding localization requires world-class experience. Rheinschrift gives your business a native voice in the German-speaking world. We offer more than 20 years’ experience providing translations and localizations for software and hardware manufacturers as well as for the sectors of business, technology, legal matters and medicine/medical applications. Our services also range from glossaries, post-editing, project management and desktop publishing services to many other related services. Rely on Rheinschrift to deliver the most competent translations and meet your deadline, whatever it takes.
Languages: German to/from major European languages

Rheinschrift Language Services Cologne, Germany
+49 (0)221-80-19-28-0
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.rheinschrift.de

Translated.

Translated.

Professional translation services made easy. Crafted by expert humans, powered by technology, efficiently delivered. We have delivered 1.2 million translations in 150 languages to 134,091 clients in 40 macro-domains since 1999, powering the globalization strategy of the most demanding clients. We work hard to make translation services more effective, by enhancing our production processes with great technologies and talented people. A perfect example is T-Rank™, the system that instantly matches your content with the most qualified translator for the job. We offer a wide range of linguistic services that cover all your future needs: Google Ads translation, software localization, subtitling, and APIs to integrate human translation. We open up language to everyone.
Languages: 150 languages and 40 areas of expertise.

Translated Rome, Italy
+390690254001

memoQ

memoQ

memoQ is a technology provider that has been delivering premium solutions to the translation industry since 2004. For almost 15 years, memoQ has been dedicated to delivering innovation through diverse developments that today help hundreds of thousands of freelance translators, translation companies and enterprises worldwide. Having simplicity and more effective translation processes in mind, memoQ combines ease of use, collaboration, interoperability and leveraging in one single tool. Discover a new world with memoQ, and let our team help optimize your translation processes and make your business more successful.
Languages: All

memoQ Budapest, Hungary
+3618088313
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.memoq.com

SDL plc

SDL plc

SDL is the global innovator in language translation technology, translation services and content management. Over the past 25 years we’ve helped companies deliver transformative business results by enabling powerful, nuanced digital experiences with customers around the world. SDL is the leading provider of translation software to the translation industry and SDL Trados Studio is recognized globally as the preferred computer-assisted translation tool of government, commercial enterprises, language service providers and freelance translators.
Languages: All

SDL plc
Maidenhead, United Kingdom
+44-1628-417227

In 2010, Translators without Borders (TWB) was formed in response to the Haiti earthquake. We translated aid information into Haitian Creole, established a translation platform, built a community of skilled linguists, and established a non-profit organization to help with this crisis and respond to other emerging crises around the world.

In 2020, to meet the unprecedented multilingual communications challenge of the COVID-19 global pandemic, TWB rapidly mobilized. We translated millions of words of COVID-19 information, partnered with a myriad of NGOs from around the world, and developed innovative language technology.

It’s been ten years. Throughout it all, TWB has helped people overcome crisis, poverty, and many other challenges by providing the means for them to access important information and communicate in their own language.

Today, ten years from our founding, TWB is the globally recognized humanitarian non-profit that believes that overcoming language barriers is key to safety, security, and to building our shared humanity. We work with a network of over 30,000 volunteer translators and a wide range of partners to deliver information, power and agency to people in need.

In humanitarian crises, we create tools like glossaries and multilingual chatbots. We ensure health information reaches everyone, especially speakers of lesser-served languages. More broadly, we develop scalable technology for these languages. Without such resources, speakers of marginalized languages face an ever-widening global knowledge gap.

TWB’s ultimate goal is to shift control of communication, helping people to access information in their language and, just as importantly, to share their own ideas and raise their voices. We must build technology that facilitates listening to what people have to say, no matter what language they speak.

TWB seeks a world where knowledge knows no language barriers. Without your help, we cannot continue this work. And, if we don’t continue, millions of people will be left behind. It is time to act.

On TWB’s ten year anniversary, we want to thank you for all of the support you have given us over the years. The work is far from over. We need your help to use the power of language and effective communications to help solve the world’s most challenging problems.

Are you in   ?  

Column

Takeaway

The TWB Journey

Ten years and counting

Donna Parrish

Donna Parrish is principal and co-founder of LocWorld. She is also secretary of Translators without Borders. In a past life, she was publisher of MultiLingual.

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It was January of 2010. A 7.0 magnitude earthquake had devastated Haiti. Since only 5% of the Haitian population was fluent in French, aid communication needed to be in Haitian Creole. This was a huge task. After this experience, Lori Thicke, who had founded the French organization Traducteurs sans Frontières, realized the world needed a larger, US-based organization to head up linguistic crisis response efforts. An organizational meeting of Translators without Borders (TWB) was held at a LocWorld in Seattle the following autumn.

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25 Years of Excellence

in East European Languages

Legal | It
Life Sciences | Finances
Consumer Products | Automotive

East European Languages
East European Languages

Albanian, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, Estonian, Hungarian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Ukrainian

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Thanks for reading our Jan/Feb 2021 issue!