COLUMNS

Demystifying the Office Manager

by Terena Bell

Great translation requires more than translators. From project managers to in-country reviewers, linguistically, an entire team must come together in order to get each message right. But what about the behind-the-scenes, non-language roles that make translation happen? From salespeople to marketers to accountants, localization companies are filled with other professionals who form the industry. How come nobody ever talks about them?

Welcome to “Behind the Scenes,” a new MultiLingual column that looks at the non-language roles that language services wouldn’t exist without. In this issue, we interview Nikki Cowland, office manager for England-based provider Anja Jones Translation (AJT). AJT is located in Newquay, on the north coast of Cornwall.

So, what does an office manager do exactly? AJT has 18 employees, which affects Cowland’s role, she says. “I have found that working for a smaller company, the role of an office manager can be truly varied and challenging, as you may find yourself wearing a number of different hats. It is constantly evolving, and I have found myself taking on new responsibilities all the time.”

It’s my Parity and I’ll Cry if I Want To

by John Tinsley

When it comes to machine translation (MT), the question of quality and how to effectively carry out evaluations has always been near the top of the agenda…

Patient Centricity in Clinical Trials

by Christophe Djaouani

Think about this: every time you reach into your medicine cabinet for some type of aid like headache relief or pain management, a clinical trial will have brought your medication to market….

Old Words, New Meanings

by Marco de Pinto

Not all English dictionaries reached the same conclusion, but if you ask the average person on the street, they will probably tell you that the words that most represented 2020…

Bursting the Bubble

by Andrew Morris

Anyone venturing into the online translator space in 2014, as I did for the first time, could have been forgiven for thinking that translation was the preserve of mostly white, relatively affluent…