Globalization

Advertisement

Maldonado named Women in Localization president

Globalization, Internationalization, Interpretation, Language, Language Industry News and Events, Localization, Translation, Uncategorized

Women in Localization has a new president: Argentine translation leader Cecilia Maldonado begins her one-year term today.

Founded in 2008, Women in Localization is a nonprofit organization that works to foster a global community for the advancement of both women and the industry by providing networking, education, career advancement, mentoring, and recognition of women’s accomplishments. Membership is free and both women and men are invited to join.

To select its officers, Women in Localization works through a succession committee. The committee interviews existing board members to determine their goals for the group, then selects a slate of candidates accordingly. Candidates are also interviewed then the final list is presented to the board, which votes. Maldonado served as vice-president in 2020 and was confirmed president for the upcoming year during the board’s last voting session.

In 2020, Women in Localization’s “high level objective” was to focus on growing global membership, “which included setting up a virtual/global chapter to focus on our remote members and provid[ing] stronger support to our non-US chapters,” according to Maldonado. Six new chapters were founded according.

“I’m super excited about my new role at [Women in Localization],” Maldonado emailed. “After constant growth, 2021 will be a year for restructuring and reorganization, simplifying and streamlining our organizational structure so we can set the foundations for enduring success. With 28 chapters in 18 different countries today, we need to step up our game to be ready for the challenges and opportunities growth brings.”

Maldonado is well-known figurehead in the localization field, having cofounded both Translated in Argentina, an industry association, and Think Latin America, a popular conference that later became part of the Globalization and Localization Association’s Think! series. She is also an active volunteer for the Association of Language Companies, a US trade group.

Nimdzi — the organization that owns MultiLingual — is an official Women in Localization partner.

+ posts

MultiLingual creates go-to news and resources for language industry professionals.

Advertisement

Related News:

Advertisement

State of German Industry Report Released

Business News, Geopolitics, Globalization, Internationalization, Language in Business, Language Industry News and Events, Localization, Localization Strategy, Localization Technology, Technology, Translation Technology

Qualitätssprachendienste Deutschlands (QSD) has released its first report on the state of the German language industry. Compiled from national statistics authority data and the responses of more than 100 companies, the report reviews market size, translation and interpreting prices, common client verticals, machine translation (MT) adoption strategies and technology development. It also lists Germany’s top language services providers and analyzes industry growth over a nine year period, as well as job creation. An additional section takes a look at how the global covid-19 pandemic has affected the sector.

According to the organization — which is a conglomerate of DIN EN ISO 9001 and ISO 17100 certified translation providers — the German market is unique in that it is even more highly fragmented “at the top” than in other western European countries. To show this fragmentation, the report maps multi-language vendors (MLVs), estimating market shares for each. It also claims foreign companies win more translation business in Germany than national leaders combined — which QSD believes will eventually lead to the sale of many of these providers.

The QSD report also discusses local translation providers’ strong focus on technology as digital native clients come into buying power. Much of this development is redundant, writes the group: “Very similar classic client portals. terminology management products, REST APIs for Plunet and [quality assurance] QA checkers will compete for buyer attention.”

More information is available at https://www.qsd.de/en/language-services-in-germany-2020/.

+ posts

MultiLingual creates go-to news and resources for language industry professionals.

Advertisement

Related News:

Advertisement

Appalachia en Español

Globalization, Language, Localization Culture, Personalization and Design, Terminology, Travel and Culture, Uncategorized

When you live in the Appalachian mountains, Spanish textbooks don’t always speak to you. That’s the realization that led Harlan County, Kentucky schoolteachers Chris Anama-Green and Emmanuel Anama-Green to create their own language instruction curricula. “When you read many ‘mainstream’ Spanish textbooks, you find mostly vocabulary and scenarios related to city life,” Chris Anama-Green told Kentucky Teacher, a Kentucky Department of Education news site. In Appalachia, for example, students are more likely to live in houses than in apartment buildings and there are no city blocks or subways. “It’s harder for students to see the importance of learning a second language when the examples provided just aren’t relevant to them,” said Chris Anama-Green. “I wanted a textbook that students could relate to,” he told local Harlan Enterprise newspaper, “When I couldn’t find one, I decided to write my own.”

The two initially partnered on an introductory Spanish I textbook that uses rural scenarios and vocabulary instead of urban ones in order to promote students’ real-world communication abilities. A Spanish II textbook is currently underway. Entitled Viajes desde Appalachia (Travels from Appalachia), the curricula does meet Kentucky World Language and American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages educational standards.

Viajes desde Appalachia references local spots within Harlan County by name and also includes full-color photographs the teachers took during their travels throughout Spanish-speaking countries.

+ posts

MultiLingual creates go-to news and resources for language industry professionals.

Advertisement

Related News:

Advertisement

New GALA Board Announced

Globalization, Internationalization, Language Industry News and Events, Localization, Translation, Uncategorized

The Globalization and Localization Association (GALA) has announced its 2021-2022 directors. Of the seven person board, four seats were up for grabs with 18 members vying for election. According to the organization, directors “help define GALA’s strategic direction and work to promote its essential role in the global language industry.”

Paula Shannon from Canadian machine translation provider Lilt is the only new representative. She joins Balázs Kis from memoQ, Alessandra Binazzi of Alessandra Binazzi Consulting and Marie Flacassier from BeatBabel — all of whom were elected to second terms. Board members María Jesús de Arriba Díaz from Vistatec, Kåre Lindahl with Venga Global and Patrick Nunes from translation client Rotary International were not up for reelection.

GALA is a not-for-profit trade association connecting and supporting an international community of organizations and individuals that enable communication and business across languages and cultures. GALA’s mission is to help its members succeed and to drive the development of the language industry by building professional communities, sharing knowledge and advancing best practices in the globalization sector.

+ posts

MultiLingual creates go-to news and resources for language industry professionals.

Advertisement

Related News:

Advertisement

Statement on Languages Calls for Embrace of Multilingualism

Globalization, Language, Uncategorized

As global and local communications continue to become more vital than ever — and more and more disparate — five academies from the UK, the US, Canada and Australia are calling for a broader embrace of languages.

In an unprecedented global call to action, five international academies from three continents have released a Joint Statement on Languages. The British Academy, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Royal Society of Canada, the Australian Academy of the Humanities, and the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia have joined forces to promote multilingualism around the world, and particularly in regions with predominantly English-speaking populations.

The call is being made as countries across the globe are struggling to disseminate timely information about the pandemic to communities that speak minority languages. It also follows a United States presidential election with the highest turnout in history, as well as record requests for non-English ballots in many regions. While this year has amplified calls for broader language access, the Joint Statement on Languages takes it a step further not just to push for language access, but also to promote active engagement across languages.

“Language education, and the accompanying linguistic and intercultural competencies, are a necessity for social, political and economic development, and for effective collaboration,” the statement explains. “During a global health crisis, researchers, governments, and health care workers must be able to share accurate information. In such times, language matters, and fluency in our languages matters. The people of the world must be able to speak to each other and be understood — to communicate as effectively and as rapidly as technology allows.”

The statement also highlights Anglophone communities as one of the most vital groups to embrace other languages, as these communities are often where some of the largest language disparities exist, seen here in the English-only voting laws still cited in Iowa.

“Today, Anglophone communities in particular are not producing enough speakers of languages other than English to meet 21st-century needs, arguing that multilingualism is too difficult to achieve, or that English should be treated as a lingua franca,” the statement goes on. “Nor are these communities sufficiently focused on what is needed for the preservation, maintenance, and invigoration of the other linguistic communities with whom they live.”

Although the statement calls for native English speakers to embrace other languages, it also recognizes the global value of English, stating that “English in particular is the most commonly taught language in the world by a factor of twenty,” and that “Providing all of our citizens full access to literate English must therefore continue to be an educational priority.”

This is one of three primary goals the statement outlines as necessary steps to ensuring language enhancement in education. The titles for each respective goal are Hold — in the case of the English — Celebrate, and GainCelebrate refers to the need to provide support and protection for “languages of minority and Indigenous populations,” while Gain refers to the general benefits to literacy, educational attainment, and employability that come from being multilingual.

The statement concludes, “We call for governments, policy makers, and educators, alongside business, industry, and others, to take concerted, systematic and coordinated action to widen capacity for, and promote the opportunities of, widely accessible education in a broad range of languages.”

 

Tags:, , , ,
+ posts

MultiLingual creates go-to news and resources for language industry professionals.

Advertisement

Related News:

Advertisement

Are five languages enough to guarantee global success?

Globalization, Language

With more than 6,000 different languages spoken worldwide, providing translation services for every known language is no simple feat. Fortunately, companies looking to expand into the global market need look little further than the (far more reasonably numbered) five primary languages of the G7.

Consisting of seven of the world’s major economies — the US, Japan, Germany, UK, France, Italy and Canada — the languages of the G7 carry a great deal of influence both in global business and politics. According to statistics from the UN, the countries of the G7 alone account for more than 46% of global gross domestic product and represent approximately 58% of global net wealth. Businesses looking for global success would do well, therefore, to start with conquering the business environments of the G7 — and these figures are to say nothing of the other countries translation in these five languages can provide access to.

English

Informally considered to be “the second language of the world” due to its high number of non-native speakers, English is an incredibly powerful language within global business and political spheres. It has more than 1.5 billion speakers worldwide and is an official language of more than 90 countries worldwide — from Antigua and Barbuda to Zimbabwe.

For this reason, it should come as little surprise that English translation services are some of the most sought-after in the entire translation industry, as companies use this language to take on markets around the world.

The economies of native English-speaking countries are also among the largest in the world. The US alone possesses a GDP in excess of $20 trillion — the largest single economy in the world and obviously an attractive target for any business looking to expand into English-speaking markets.

French

French is one of the world’s fastest-growing languages. The official language of 29 countries, spanning five continents, French is second only to English in regard to the sheer breadth of its influence.

According to UN statistics for 2017, France itself is the sixth largest economy in the world, with a GDP of more than $2.5 trillion.

Due to population growth and economic development throughout Africa, where around 50% of native French speakers can be found, the influence of the French language is to grow rapidly. As such, French translation services are likely to be of key importance to any business looking to expand globally.

German

While perhaps not as broadly spoken worldwide as English or French, German is one of the most widely spoken languages in Europe and is a language of great political and economic significance.

Germany itself possesses the largest economy in Europe, with a GDP of around $4 trillion. Additionally, alongside French and English, German is one of the major procedural languages of the European Union. As such, German translation services can open access to the second largest single market economy in the world, accounting for a GDP of more than $18 trillion.

Italian

Italy is home to another of the world’s largest economies, with a national GDP of around $2 trillion. Italy is the fifth most visited country in the world and is a hub of world culture, with 53 World Heritage Sites — more than any other country in the world.

Alongside the obvious popularity of the Italian language within Europe, Italian also carries a great deal of influence in South and Central America and even across parts of Africa. Italian translation services can thus offer a prospective global business the opportunity to expand into a number of new markets on both sides of the Atlantic.

Japanese

Although distribution of the Japanese language is anomalously dense, with more than 124 million of the language’s 128 million speakers living in Japan and its neighboring island groups, Japanese is nonetheless a language of great importance in global business.

Japan possesses the third largest single economy in the world, with a national GDP of almost $5 trillion. It is a manufacturing and electronic engineering powerhouse; Japanese brand-name products are found in households worldwide. Additionally, global investment in Japanese industry has long been some of the highest in the world. In 2015, Japan was home to home to 254 Fortune 500 companies. With Japanese business so significant worldwide, Japanese translation services are a vital tool for a company looking to ensure its global success.

Translation services

Through professional translation of just five languages, a global company could theoretically possess the linguistic skills necessary to expand into more than 100 countries, spread across all seven continents. That is, if specific country regulations and local language variations and cultural questions are not an issue.

Language barriers need not be an obstacle to guaranteeing the global success of your business — just a few languages can provide the springboard to launch your company around the world.

Tags:, , , , , ,
+ posts

Louise Taylor manages content for the Tomedes Translators blog. She has worked in the language and translation industry for many years.

Advertisement

Related News:

Advertisement

Reaching a global audience to maximize your startup’s potential

Globalization, Language in Business, Localization Basics

Globalization maximize startups

The Global Policy Forum reported as far back as the year 2000 that the pace of globalization — the process by which organizations start operating or influencing internationally — was quickening. Technological advances have been key to this change of pace. Globalization is not without its drawbacks, but many leading economists and business analysts believe it is better than the alternative. Indeed, Deloitte reports that after the global financial crisis in 2008, leaders around the world pledged to avoid protectionist measures to boost growth and speed up the global financial recovery.

The global environment we now live in poses both challenges and opportunities for new businesses. Startups today have a wider audience at their fingertips than ever before. A vast international customer base awaits those with the vision and courage to reach out to it. Technology can help with this, and the next issue of MultiLingual, on startups, will cover this when it goes live in a few days.

But the human element is still essential. Let’s look at language as an example of this.

Microsoft has just announced its latest machine translation (MT) success: achieving parity with the quality of human translation for the Chinese-English language pairing on 2,000 sentences in a test environment. However, there is still an incredibly long way to go before MT can rival human translation services. As such, startups that want to promote their products globally are reliant on professional human translators in order to assist them.

Adaptation and localization services are also essential. An image that is perfectly acceptable in one country can cause sufficient offense for arrest warrants to be issued in another. Any business with global aspirations therefore needs to use specialist local knowledge when globalizing its brand. Doing so does take time, but the rewards can be well worth the effort.

Our company, for example, recently launched 11 new websites targeting clients in various new countries as part of its globalization strategy. The French site is targeted to customers in France, Belgium, Canada and other French-speaking countries. Meanwhile, the German site is aimed at German-speaking territories, such as Germany, Switzerland and Austria.

The choice of languages for the new sites was the result of extensive research. Supply and demand were the cornerstones of the research. The demand front covered the number of speakers of the languages being considered, local business activity, size of potential customer base and search engine statistics (anchors, keyword volumes and more). On the supply side, we investigated competition and concurrency in the relevant markets, availability of local translation and localization experts, cost of advertising, cost of pay per click/SEO and similar parameters.

For companies just starting out, global dominance may seem a tall order. However, the right product can have almost boundless appeal. Have you heard of Slack? If you haven’t, you’re behind the curve. Founded less than a decade ago, the business messaging system is now available in more than 100 countries around the world. Meanwhile, TV network Netflix, founded in 1997, is available in all but four countries (China, Crimea, North Korea and Syria).For companies just starting out, global dominance may seem a tall order. However, the right product can have almost boundless appeal. Click To Tweet

Not every startup will want to go global. However, even the smallest of ideas can go a long way in the global environment in which we live. You might dream of simply running a local coffee shop, but that’s how Starbucks started too. The world’s largest coffee company, it now operates in 62 countries.

Whatever your business niche, it’s likely that there’s money to be made by turning globalization to your advantage. A carefully devised strategy, based on appropriate research, is the starting point. Identifying target countries and languages through a measured approach will ensure that time and money are both used efficiently when it comes to international expansion plans.

If you have a great product or service, the world really can be your oyster.

Tags:, , , ,
+ posts

Louise Taylor manages content for the Tomedes Translators blog. She has worked in the language and translation industry for many years.

Advertisement

Related News: