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12 Top Language Industry Podcasts to Listen to in 2021

freelancing, Internationalization, Interpretation, Language, Language in Business, Localization, Localization Basics, Localization Culture, Localization Strategy, Localization Technology, Marketing, Multimedia Translation, Personalization and Design, Technology, Translation, Translation Technology, Uncategorized

According to podcast production company Podcast Insights, more than 850,000 separate podcasts are out there in the world, waiting to be listened to today. With that many out there, it can be tough to find the ones that matter to translators.

With that in mind, we’ve listed the top 12 localization industry podcasts being released today in alphabetical order below. To make our list, producers must have released a show within the last month. We’ve also limited the list to localization and interpreting industry topics — no podcasts on literature in translation, language learning (unless they also talk translation), etc.

Conversations

Australia is represented by Conversations, a podcast from language services provider (LSP) All Graduates Interpreting and Translation Services. Reporters, professors and practitioners come together to discuss the country’s most pressing translation and interpreting issues.

Global Ambitions

Produced by LSP Venga, Global Ambitions talks about international go-to-market strategies, global marketing, internationalization and localization.

The Global Podcast

Hosted by Michael Stevens — vice president for the Americas at Translated — and Renato Beninatto — cofounder of MutliLingual‘s parent organization Nimdzi — The Global Podcast discusses foreign markets, global brands and other macrofactors that influence the localization industry.

Globally Speaking

Globally Speaking talks about everything in the language industry from translation to interpreting to language learning. Recent topics include video localization and how dating app Tinder got translated.

The Loc Show

Translation management system (TMS) Smartling hosts The Loc Show, a podcast that interviews translation and localization buyers. This show replaces Smartling’s previous podcast, Move the World with Words.

Marketing Tips for Translators

Swedish translator Tess Whitty is well known for her podcasts replete with marketing insights for freelance translators. Marketing Tips for Translators‘ guest list is a veritable who’s who of the localization industry.

Not Quite Magic

It’s all women, all the time at podcast Not Quite Magic, where female linguists talk interpreting. The show is organized by three freelance conference interpreters: Liz Essary, Laura Holcomb and Elena Langdon.

Speaking of Translation

French translators Eve Lindemuth Bodeux and Corinne McKay have long produced their well-known podcast Speaking of Translation. Together the two discuss issues facing freelancers, such as contract negotiations, handling international payments and goal-setting.

Translation Confessional

Produced by LSP Word Awareness, Translation Confessional looks at the pros and cons of being a translator.

Translation Confidential

Over at Translation Confidential, Argo Translation talks about regulatory matters impacting the language industry — such as ISO standards and EU medical device translation requirements.

The Translation Company Talk Show

The Translation Company Talk Show covers B2B language industry topics, such as corporate globalization or how to grow your LSP during the pandemic.

Troublesome Terps

Troublesome Terps‘ hosts are also interpreters, which means they talk about interpretation a lot.

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MultiLingual creates go-to news and resources for language industry professionals.

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2021 State of Localization Survey

AI, Localization

lilThe COVID-19 pandemic has thrown the world into disarray, uprooting the way companies and employees operate on a daily basis. The localization industry has seen the effects of these changes, as many companies are moving workflows online and are looking to expand globally with localization.

This shift has caused leaders within the industry to rethink budgets, workflows, timelines, and more. As a result, the localization industry is facing new challenges that haven’t been seen before.

To find out more about these unprecedented changes and challenges, Lilt, the world’s leading AI-powered language services provider, is launching its 2021 State of Localization survey (research.net/r/survey21). This survey aims to gather more data and detailed information to help localization teams effectively plan for what, for many companies, has become a more uncertain future.

Lilt was founded in 2015 to help make the world’s information accessible to everyone, regardless of where they live or what language they speak. To do this, we streamline the localization process to provide translation services to customers worldwide.

In our recently launched survey, respondents will be asked a series of questions to better understand localization trends, best practices, and the most important priorities for leaders at companies of all sizes and industries. The seven-minute survey will be used to publish a report sharing the research findings, trends, and help guide localization decisions for 2021 and beyond. Take the survey here: research.net/r/survey21.

As a localization services provider, we work closely with our customers to better understand their needs and how we can help simplify their localization efforts. But we also want to better provide the localization community at-large with the insights and services they need to grow.

We’re looking forward to sharing the results of the survey over the coming months. Qualified survey respondents will receive a $5 gift card and will be entered for a chance to win our $1,000 grand prize. The survey runs until March 31, 2021, so get started today!

 

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Google Translate Causes Vaccine Mishap

Language in Business, Language in the News, Localization Basics, Personalization and Design, Translation, Translation Technology, Uncategorized

Last week, MultiLingual reported on a Virginia Department of Health website translation error that incorrectly told Spanish speakers they don’t need coronavirus vaccines. New information from Richmond, Virginia newspaper The Virginian-Pilot now reveals how this error came to be.

“The Virginia Department of Health’s main sources for translating critical covid-19 and vaccine information are three marketing agencies that don’t list translation services on their websites and Google Translate,” Sabrina Moreno reports, pointing out that both translation reliability experts and Google itself caution medical providers not to use the free online tool for medical translations. Google translated “the vaccine is not required” as “the vaccine is not necessary” on the Department of Health’s frequently asked questions website.

In the United States, Hispanics have been disproportionately affected by the coronavirus with higher death and hospitalization rates than white Americans. Ensuring this group has access to covid-19 vaccines is of particular importance in Virginia where — as of January 13th — Latinos only accounted for 9 percent of those receiving a dose despite making up 21 percent of the commonwealth’s covid-19 hospitalizations.

“Immigrant advocates and certified translators said the state’s failure to prioritize adequate translation showed Virginia’s lack of investment in populations already facing a trust gap in the health care system and language barriers that have historically limited access to medical care,” writes Moreno.

Luis Oyola, director of organizing for Legal Aid Justice Center in Richmond, says he’s been warning the state of what Moreno calls “the desperate need for translated and culturally competent materials” since March. “The government is reaping what they sowed,” Oyola told The Virginian-Pilot

The government, however, continues to stand beside its mistranslation. “Many Spanish speakers do read this form as it was intended — namely, to make clear the vaccine is not mandatory and therefore will not be forced on anyone,” director of communications Maria Reppas told local television station ABC 8News.

Nearly 1.4 million Virginians speak a language other than English at home. More than half of these people speak Spanish.

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Terena Bell is an independent journalist who writes for The Atlantic, Washington Post, Fast Company and others. She is former CEO of In Every Language.

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Localization & Race: Disney’s Dubbing Controversy

freelancing, Geopolitics, Language in the News, Localization, Localization Culture, Localization Strategy, Multimedia Translation, Personalization and Design, Uncategorized

Disney/Pixar’s localization of the movie Soul has generated some race-related controversy, according to The Independent. Released in 41 different countries, the film is about a Black jazz player who tries to reunite his body and his soul after the two accidentally split apart. It’s only the fourth animated movie in the history of American cinema to feature a Black character in the leading role.

The film hasn’t gone without criticism in the United States, where cultural news sites like Gizmodo, Screen Rant, and Insider have pointed out that Soul seems to lean into Black stereotypes. In its original English version, the film uses a white actor to voice the main, Black character’s soul — something Gizmodo and others claim removes Black agency.

In Denmark and Germany, white actors voice the character’s body as well, sparking the Danish controversy. (If German cinema-goers are upset, the media is yet to report it.) “A number of activists and scholars suggested that [the] casting was an example of structural racism,” reports The Independent. Nikolaj Lie Kaas — the voice actor who received the lead Danish part — said, “My position with regards to any job is very simple. Let the man or woman who can perform the work in the best possible way get the job.”

The language industry, however, has long considered non-qualification related factors in “who gets the job.” In interpreting especially, US providers often pair limited-English proficients (LEP) with interpreters of the same gender for assignments, based on language and topic. If an LEP has been raped, for example, crisis centers may require a same gender interpreter as a way to help minimize trauma. For religious reasons, female Arabic and Somali speakers also may require female interpreters for medical visits. In these instances, a man very well may be the best interpreter in town, but other factors must be considered in awarding the job. That said, film localization is a different field and appears to adhere to different standards in at least some cases.

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MultiLingual creates go-to news and resources for language industry professionals.

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Weekly Shorts | January 15, 2021

Business News, Geopolitics, Interpretation, Language in the News, Language Industry News and Events, Localization, Multimedia Translation, Personalization and Design, Technology, Terminology, Translation, Uncategorized, Weekly Shorts

Translation error says Spanish speakers don’t need vaccine

A localization error on the Virginia Department of Health’s website told Spanish speakers they don’t need coronavirus vaccines, according to Norfolk, Virginia newspaper The Virginian-Pilot. Medical students at George Mason University discovered the mistake, which may have stemmed from unclear source text: “Before the faulty translation, the English passage simply meant the vaccine wasn’t mandatory,” the paper reports.

TransPerfect opens Istanbul office

New York-based translation company TransPerfect has opened a new outpost in Istanbul, Turkey. N Can Okay will oversee the office, dealing primarily with talent recruitment, according to a company release.

Neural interpretation from TikTok?

ByteDance, the parent company of international social media platform TikTok, has gotten in the interpreting game, releasing an open source tool named NeurST: Neural Speech Translation Toolkit. Note this is a misnomer, as the tech does not translate written language — rather interprets verbal speech. Full code is available on collaboration portal GitHub.

Nieman Lab predicts non-English news

American journalism think tank The Nieman Lab anticipates the United States will see more non-English news content in 2021 as both translated and in-language reporting increase. “Additionally, we foresee more substantive and equitable partnerships developing between mainstream and ethnic media organizations,” write Stefanie Murray and Anthony Advincula.

ATA accepting conference proposals

The American Translators Association has issued its call for presentation proposals for the association’s October 27-30, 2021 conference. The event will be held in Minneapolis, Minnesota with virtual attendance options. Proposals are accepted through March 1.

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Maldonado named Women in Localization president

Globalization, Internationalization, Interpretation, Language, Language Industry News and Events, Localization, Translation, Uncategorized

Women in Localization has a new president: Argentine translation leader Cecilia Maldonado begins her one-year term today.

Founded in 2008, Women in Localization is a nonprofit organization that works to foster a global community for the advancement of both women and the industry by providing networking, education, career advancement, mentoring, and recognition of women’s accomplishments. Membership is free and both women and men are invited to join.

To select its officers, Women in Localization works through a succession committee. The committee interviews existing board members to determine their goals for the group, then selects a slate of candidates accordingly. Candidates are also interviewed then the final list is presented to the board, which votes. Maldonado served as vice-president in 2020 and was confirmed president for the upcoming year during the board’s last voting session.

In 2020, Women in Localization’s “high level objective” was to focus on growing global membership, “which included setting up a virtual/global chapter to focus on our remote members and provid[ing] stronger support to our non-US chapters,” according to Maldonado. Six new chapters were founded according.

“I’m super excited about my new role at [Women in Localization],” Maldonado emailed. “After constant growth, 2021 will be a year for restructuring and reorganization, simplifying and streamlining our organizational structure so we can set the foundations for enduring success. With 28 chapters in 18 different countries today, we need to step up our game to be ready for the challenges and opportunities growth brings.”

Maldonado is well-known figurehead in the localization field, having cofounded both Translated in Argentina, an industry association, and Think Latin America, a popular conference that later became part of the Globalization and Localization Association’s Think! series. She is also an active volunteer for the Association of Language Companies, a US trade group.

Nimdzi — the organization that owns MultiLingual — is an official Women in Localization partner.

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State of German Industry Report Released

Business News, Geopolitics, Globalization, Internationalization, Language in Business, Language Industry News and Events, Localization, Localization Strategy, Localization Technology, Technology, Translation Technology

Qualitätssprachendienste Deutschlands (QSD) has released its first report on the state of the German language industry. Compiled from national statistics authority data and the responses of more than 100 companies, the report reviews market size, translation and interpreting prices, common client verticals, machine translation (MT) adoption strategies and technology development. It also lists Germany’s top language services providers and analyzes industry growth over a nine year period, as well as job creation. An additional section takes a look at how the global covid-19 pandemic has affected the sector.

According to the organization — which is a conglomerate of DIN EN ISO 9001 and ISO 17100 certified translation providers — the German market is unique in that it is even more highly fragmented “at the top” than in other western European countries. To show this fragmentation, the report maps multi-language vendors (MLVs), estimating market shares for each. It also claims foreign companies win more translation business in Germany than national leaders combined — which QSD believes will eventually lead to the sale of many of these providers.

The QSD report also discusses local translation providers’ strong focus on technology as digital native clients come into buying power. Much of this development is redundant, writes the group: “Very similar classic client portals. terminology management products, REST APIs for Plunet and [quality assurance] QA checkers will compete for buyer attention.”

More information is available at https://www.qsd.de/en/language-services-in-germany-2020/.

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A New Translation App from…Hyundai?

AI, Business News, Language in Business, Localization, Localization Technology, Machine Learning, Technology, Translation, Translation Technology, Uncategorized

There’s a new Korean-English translation app out there and it’s made by Hyundai. That’s right: The automobile manufacturer has gotten in the language business.

According to newspaper The Korea Herald, AIRS Company — an artificial intelligence subsidiary of Hyundai Motor Group — developed the tool in order to help the corporation’s international employees communicate. Called the H-Translator, it uses an artificial neural network (ANN) to translate written text as well as extract copy from captured images.

The South Korea-based AIRS Company was established in 2018 and began building the app in 2019. H-Translator can be used both as a standalone tool and with external chat tools. The manufacturer is currently working on adding additional languages and wearable functionality.

In a statement posted on Facebook on December 17, AIRS Company used Facebook’s translation automation to announce the tool into languages other than Korean. In English, one of the more coherent portions read “From the world, we offer the highest level of translation quality specialized in the automotive industry. We are looking forward to being a beginner of translator development for communication between the future vehicles or robots, etc.”

Founded in 1967, Hyundai is a South Korean automotive manufacturer headquartered in Seoul. The company is no stranger to international business: it operates the world’s largest integrated automobile manufacturing facility in Ulsan, South Korea, and employs about 75,000 people all over the world. As Hyundai has noted, many employees don’t speak the same language. Hyundai vehicles are sold in 193 countries.

In September, Business Korea reported that Hyundai had recruited top AI scholars as part of a strategic transition to expand its offerings: “To pioneer the future of sustainable mobility, [Hyundai] is undergoing an ambitious transformation from an automotive manufacturer to a smart mobility solution provider and it is invested and engaged in various projects and collaborations covering AI, autonomous driving, electrification, and Mobility as a Service (MaaS).”

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Appalachia en Español

Globalization, Language, Localization Culture, Personalization and Design, Terminology, Travel and Culture, Uncategorized

When you live in the Appalachian mountains, Spanish textbooks don’t always speak to you. That’s the realization that led Harlan County, Kentucky schoolteachers Chris Anama-Green and Emmanuel Anama-Green to create their own language instruction curricula. “When you read many ‘mainstream’ Spanish textbooks, you find mostly vocabulary and scenarios related to city life,” Chris Anama-Green told Kentucky Teacher, a Kentucky Department of Education news site. In Appalachia, for example, students are more likely to live in houses than in apartment buildings and there are no city blocks or subways. “It’s harder for students to see the importance of learning a second language when the examples provided just aren’t relevant to them,” said Chris Anama-Green. “I wanted a textbook that students could relate to,” he told local Harlan Enterprise newspaper, “When I couldn’t find one, I decided to write my own.”

The two initially partnered on an introductory Spanish I textbook that uses rural scenarios and vocabulary instead of urban ones in order to promote students’ real-world communication abilities. A Spanish II textbook is currently underway. Entitled Viajes desde Appalachia (Travels from Appalachia), the curricula does meet Kentucky World Language and American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages educational standards.

Viajes desde Appalachia references local spots within Harlan County by name and also includes full-color photographs the teachers took during their travels throughout Spanish-speaking countries.

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MultiLingual creates go-to news and resources for language industry professionals.

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New GALA Board Announced

Globalization, Internationalization, Language Industry News and Events, Localization, Translation, Uncategorized

The Globalization and Localization Association (GALA) has announced its 2021-2022 directors. Of the seven person board, four seats were up for grabs with 18 members vying for election. According to the organization, directors “help define GALA’s strategic direction and work to promote its essential role in the global language industry.”

Paula Shannon from Canadian machine translation provider Lilt is the only new representative. She joins Balázs Kis from memoQ, Alessandra Binazzi of Alessandra Binazzi Consulting and Marie Flacassier from BeatBabel — all of whom were elected to second terms. Board members María Jesús de Arriba Díaz from Vistatec, Kåre Lindahl with Venga Global and Patrick Nunes from translation client Rotary International were not up for reelection.

GALA is a not-for-profit trade association connecting and supporting an international community of organizations and individuals that enable communication and business across languages and cultures. GALA’s mission is to help its members succeed and to drive the development of the language industry by building professional communities, sharing knowledge and advancing best practices in the globalization sector.

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