Localization

Humor and AI: Does It Travel?

Conversational interfaces such as chatbots and voice assistants present many localization challenges — humor, for example. And that’s not even considering if the original content was all that funny to begin with. Humor: The final frontier “Are there any Scottish people in the audience?” Always a great start to a presentation at a conference. The response I...

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Localization and Mobile in Asia

It’s happened: the most populous country in the world has almost reached peak smartphone saturation among internet users. 788 million people are mobile users, a whopping 98 percent of the country’s total user base,” Statista notes. This “illustrates just how efficient China has proven at rolling out network coverage as well as how mobile technology has become an indispensable facet of everyday life in the country.”

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Terminology Glosses: Hikikomori and Ikigai

Let’s talk about Japanese terminology. In Japanese, the personal pronoun 私 (watashi, I) becomes 私たち (watashitachi, we) thanks to the suffix たち (tachi, mark of the plural). The linguistic phenomenon of adding suffixes and particles so as to adjust words to the structural needs of a language is called agglutination and, more specifically, it belongs...

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Localizing a job board

Being a seasoned localizer, I thought that localizing a job board (Gigajob.com) would not present much of a challenge, but I was pleasantly surprised with the knowledge that I gained. Gigajob has now been successfully localized into 38 languages and has local sites in 147 countries. The mission of any job board is to create a...

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Are You A Startup Sherpa Or A UX Rockstar? Don’t Believe A Word

Shopping Around For Sherpas Check out this superb article by linguist, lexicographer, columnist, and self-described “all-around word nut”  Ben Zimmer (@bgzimmer) in The Atlantic. Ben discusses the cultural misappropriation of words and how sherpas, ninjas, and gurus crop up everywhere: Why Do Supreme Court Nominees Have ‘Sherpas’? Ben argues that this kind of contrived lexical exoticism hides the complex cultural...

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Haven’t an Iota About Fintech Localization? Try Cryptocurrencies

Money, Money, Money Meets Its Waterloo Apologies to ABBA fans about the cheesy introduction. But, mamma mia we need to talk about cryptocurrencies! The Chips Are Down For Fintech I enjoyed a must-read Medium article from Graham Rigby of Iota Localisation Services about the challenges of Fintech localization. Graham talks about how Fintech localization is different from...

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Traditional versus Simplified Chinese

The word “Chinese” refers to a group of spoken languages which are as different to one another as French, Portuguese or Italian and to three distinct written languages: Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese and Classical Chinese. These written forms of Chinese are written and read by speakers of all of the different spoken Chinese languages.

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The Irish Language: A Cereal Troublemaker Hits the Gaeltacht

I joined my son (aged 13) for breakfast and asked him if he knew the Irish for "cereal". Officially, the term would be "gránach bricfeasta" or similar, but he simply said, "calóga" (which basically means "flakes"). But I immediately thought he said "Cellógga", my Dublin urban Irish ear already tuned into expecting to hear brand names and slang as terminology.

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