Technology

When Myself and Himself of Smartling Met at the #Websummit

Delighted to say that I’ve finally met in person with Jack Welde (@jwelde) of Smartling. We’ve been missing each other for about 12 months now due to our gallivanting around the world taking care of our respective responsibilities. And where better to meet the man than at the Dublin Websummit (“Where the Tech World Meets”, as...

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Minimum Viable Product: Globalization

Yes, been waiting to get a Silicon Valley-style allusion to MVP (Minimum Viable Product) into a blog post for ages. And now, thanks to Java and Android guru and i18n veteran John O’Conner (@joconner), here it is: The Absolute Minimum You Need to Know About Internationalization A simple, straightforward and understandable list of the key things...

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On Chimpanzees, Translators, and Technology: #Haterzgonnahate

User experience (UX) is about understanding everything a user encounters along the journey to completing a task. Working in UX means observing the people, places and things that surround a user as they work and understanding the context. We UX types rely on techniques such as ethnography and are familiar with Jane Goodall‘s grounding study of chimpanzees as we...

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Localization: Culture and Context Cuts Both Ways

We often make the mistake of assuming that all source material intended for localization for a target country or region is in English and that conventions from the source locale content can be easily accommodated in localized versions. But, here’s an example from Nintendo to show the kind of problems that can arise when localizing...

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The Localizer's Best Friend: t()

I’m always on the lookout for software development solutions that are smart, disruptive, novel, and that challenge assumptions to solve a business problem. I recently attended an SF Globalization meetup event in San Francisco hosted by Airbnb. There, I saw localization (and UX) convention stood on its head by something anyone working in developer relations...

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Localization Unconference – Canadian Edition

Oleksandr Pysaryuk (@alexpysaryuk) shares the insights on the organization, takeaways, and people from the Localization Unconference in Toronto. And what might be next… On a chilly Ontario morning of January 23, Achievers office in Liberty Village in Toronto welcomed 43 localization enthusiasts to the first ever Localization Unconference in Canada. The rules were no prepared...

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Transifex: A Language Developers Understand

I’m hearing great things from software professionals about Transifex, a SaaS translation solution based in Silicon Valley.  As I work in user experience developer relations, I Skyped in Dimitris Glezos (@glezos), Transifex founder and Chief Ninja, in Greece to find out more. Dimitris’s background is in software development, Transifex originating as an open source project. The...

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Working Out Context in the Enterprise: Localize That!

I just came across an interesting terminology issue for enterprise applications’ user experience and localization, generally. What should we call the people in an organization who do the work of the business and rely on software to help them do so? Take the English language term worker appearing in a software application’s user interface (UI)....

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Correct Youse of English: Your Personal Dialect Map is Here

Thought I was done with regional English? No chance. The Irish Times recently predicted that the phrase “you guys” will soon be accepted as the new second-person plural pronoun in English. As a native Dubliner, I am very familiar with such evolution, the locals already having adopted “youse” and “yiz” as replacements for the pronoun. As...

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DARE to be HyperLocal: Context and Language at the Mall

I love this piece about regional language preferences from the San Francisco Chronicle blog, “Which Words Are Special to Californian?”. It offers us a look at the Harvard University Press Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE), described as “…an Urban Dictionary you can share with your parents and co-workers without fear of being disowned or...

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