Tag: crowdsourced

Advertisement

Kudos and Comhghairdeas* to Duolingo’s Irish Language Volunteers

Language, Language in the News, Translation Technology

The Irish President (Uachtarán Na hEireann) Michael D. Higgins (Micheál D Ó hUigínn) (@PresidentIRL) has publicly recognized seven volunteers for their work in building up the Irish language (Gaeilge) version of the crowd-sourced, languagelearning social app Duolingo (@duolingo).

Duolingo on Twitter

Duolingo on Twitter

This is first time I’ve read about a head of state doing something like this in the language space, although volunteerism is something that’s often acknowledged publicly by officialdom.

Indeed, it is well-deserved recognition for these Duolingo volunteers given the results.

Duolingo Irish in the Top Ten

Over the past two years, over 2.3 million people had downloaded the language app and selected Irish as the language they wanted to learn. This means that Irish is in the top 10 most popular languages offered by Duolingo.

Over 2.3 million users have selected Irish as the language they want to learn on Duolingo

Over 2.3 million Duolingo users have selected Irish as the language they want to learn

About 75% of these Irish language users are outside of Ireland, and the majority of new learners are located in the United States.

President Higgins commended the volunteers’ efforts at the official residence of the President, Áras an Uachtaráin, saying that their contribution was “an act of both national and global citizenship”.

The President also took this opportunity to comment on the status of the Irish language generally and about Government plans for the language.

Well done to Duolingo and to its volunteers in Ireland, and indeed everywhere!

The Duolingo Lessons for Other Languages

The Journal.ie quotes Oisín Ó Doinn, one of the volunteers, who was clearly delighted so many are enjoying the benefits of the contributions made to the Irish language lessons on Duolingo:

“The fact that an average of 3,000 people a day have begun using the Duolingo Irish course shows the massive worldwide interest in our native language and makes all the hard work we put in worthwhile.”

Aodhán Ó Deá (@aodhanodea) of Conradh na Gaeilge (@CnaG) was also quoted by the Journal.ie about Irish language proficiency and the reasons behind it. Some of his remarks will resonate with many Irish people:

“The thing I hear again and again from people is ‘I’d love to learn the language’, and I wish I learned it in school’.

So, despite all the negativity we hear about the Irish language, particularly from within Ireland, Duolingo’s success with their Irish language version again proves that not only do people want to try and master conversational Irish but that when the digital user experience (UX) of language learning suits their world, and it is made easy and is fun, they will give it an honest shot and try to learn.

Duolingo Irish language lesson in action

Duolingo Irish language lesson in action

Again it is also clear how smart use of technology and an ever-improving UX can benefit the health of “minor” languages.

Duolingo language learning options. Duolingo also offers gamfication and social ventures to the experience of learning Irish.

Duolingo language learning options. Duolingo also offers gamfication and social features to the experience of learning Irish.

It will be interesting to see how the Duolingo impact plays out, if at all, in the responses to questions about Irish language usage in the next Irish census!

Other languages, please take note!

The Irish President's speech to Duolingo's Irish volunteers and about the Irish language generally is on SoundCloud

The Irish President’s speech about Duolingo’s Irish volunteers, and about the state of the Irish language generally is on SoundCloud.

You can listen to the Irish President’s Áras an Uachtaráin speech about Duolingo’s Irish volunteers and about the Irish language on SoundCloud.

  • Congratulations (in Irish).
Tags:, , , , , , , , , , ,
+ posts

Ultan Ó Broin (@localization), is an independent UX consultant. With three decades of UX and L10n experience and outreach, he specializes in helping people ensure their global digital transformation makes sense culturally and also reflects how users behave locally.

Any views expressed are his own. Especially the ones you agree with.

Advertisement

Related News:

Advertisement
SDL Tados 2021

The Future of Web Translation: Haters Gonna Hate

Language in the News, Translation Technology

Just lurrve this TEDxCMU talk by Luis von Ahn of CMU called Duolingo: The Next Chapter in Human Computation. It’s all about smart people working together to solve worldwide information problems.

You know those annoying reCaptcha word combinations that you have to enter on some sites to verify that you’re a real person? Did you realize that they were part of a crowdsourced solution to digitize millions of words, for example twenty years of the New York Times? Again, CMU folks behind that one. Check out the video.

Luis goes on to tell us about Duolingo, a crowdsourced solution to translate the interweb’s information that solves those problems of motivating people to contribute translations freely and the lack of bilinguals. How? By leveraging the millions of people who want to learn another language. The solution is not only smart from a translation perspective, but much fairer in terms of language education too. Not everyone can afford those expensive languagelearning solutions.

Example of Duolingo-based translation shown by Luis von Ahn in the TEDxCMU video

Example of Duolingo-based translation shown by Luis von Ahn in the TEDxCMU video

Of course, Duolingo is now sure to attract the same decontextualized criticisms that Google Translate, Facebook crowdsourcing translation, and the rest of the community-based or ‘free’ approaches, attract from the ‘professional’ quarter. However, as Renato Beninatto points out, the battle is already won and nobody will be out of a job. So fess up folks while the rest of us call out such criticisms what they really are: a sales pitch for paid translation linked to fears about as credible as ye olde claims that the introduction of steam locomotives would turn cows milk sour (hat tip for analogy: @renatobeninatto), while being dismissive of those who desire to actually help the world to exchange information and communicate freely in any language they like (I don’t care if someone then wants to sell ads off the freely translated content).

The Duolingo.com site hasn’t gone live yet, but you can sign up for a beta preview. If you’re interested.

Tags:, , , , ,
+ posts

Ultan Ó Broin (@localization), is an independent UX consultant. With three decades of UX and L10n experience and outreach, he specializes in helping people ensure their global digital transformation makes sense culturally and also reflects how users behave locally.

Any views expressed are his own. Especially the ones you agree with.

Related News: