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Tag: Dublin

Haven’t an Iota About Fintech Localization? Try Cryptocurrencies

Localization, Localization Technology

Money, Money, Money Meets Its Waterloo

Apologies to ABBA fans about the cheesy introduction. But, mamma mia we need to talk about cryptocurrencies!

Lattés with your Litecoin? Crypto Café in Dublin, accepts cryptocurrencies and hard cash. (Image: Ultan Ó Broin)

Lattés with your Litecoin? Crypto Café in Dublin, Ireland accepts cryptocurrencies and hard cash. (Image: Ultan Ó Broin)

The Chips Are Down For Fintech

I enjoyed a must-read Medium article from Graham Rigby of Iota Localisation Services about the challenges of Fintech localization. Graham talks about how Fintech localization is different from ERP financial or vertical banking localization. He also tells us how a changing business environment means localization providers need to be agile, collaborative, and flexible:

“The way financial products are sold, communicated, and presented in the current market mean that linguists who have spent 20 years translating mortgage terms might not be best equipped to deal with the style and nuance of the text in a money transfer app.”

Indeed, the very notion of a “bank” itself has changed: Deutsche Bank in Berlin is now into Kaffee und Kuchen for the hip and happening people of the Hauptstadt.  ImaginBank from Spain is aimed at snombies, sorry, I mean the mobile generation.

And now, cryptocurrency localization is upon us, and that requires linguistic domain expertise too. Ironically, there is even a cryptocurrency called … Iota (designed for use with the Internet of Things [IOT]).

Oh No, It’s ONO!

I’ve changed career in the last few months, now offering digital transformation consultancy to established and startup ventures seeking to design the right digital thing the right way and to be ready to go global. I’ve been diving into the cryptocurrency space and grappling with the new ideas, concepts, and a new strange language that comes with it.

Cryptocurrency word cloud: Has language itself been disrupted by innovation? (Wordle by Ultan Ó Broin)

Cryptocurrency word cloud: Has language itself been disrupted by innovation? (Wordle by Ultan Ó Broin)

This is about much more than the Bitcoin and blockchain buzzwords du jour that people throw about without actually having an iota what these mean or indeed possible uses (blockchain, for example is behind the Chinese social media platform, ONO).

Mental “Block” About Cryptocurrencies?

If you want to explore this decentralised space further, there’s a blog series worth reading from Genson C. Glier on blockchain, Bitcoin, Ethereum, and cryptocurrency. I also recommend  this podcast from Tim Ferriss that covers all you were afraid to ask about, although some of terms and concepts will make your head spin (cheat list: jump to the “Show Notes” on the podcast). Try understanding these terms: Miner, Smart Contract, Daap, Truffle, Ganache, Hashcash, “Wet” Code, “Dry” Code, ICO, Metamask, and Gas.

Advertisement for eToro cyrptocurrency platform on Dublin public transport. Interest in cryptocurrencies has increased greatly in Ireland.

Advertisement for the eToro cryptocurrency platform on Dublin public transport. Interest in cryptocurrencies has increased greatly in Ireland. (Image: Ultan Ó Broin)

Although many people and institutions are rightly cautious about cryptocurrencies, they are a “thing” now and attitudes are shifting from suspicion to curiosity Providing localization of the conversation around cryptocurrencies and non-developer facing terms would be a great starting point to increase familiarity and adoption

Providing localization of the conversation around cryptocurrencies and non-developer facing terms would be a great starting point to increase familiarity and adoption Click To Tweet.

Read the small print. Consumer warning about cryptocurrencies lack regulation and protection on an eToro advertisement in Dublin, Ireland. (Image: Ultan Ó Broin)

Read the fine print. Consumer warning about cryptocurrency lack of regulation and protection on an eToro advertisement in Dublin, Ireland. (Image: Ultan Ó Broin)

Cryptocurrency Localization Needed

Generally, cryptocurrencies are for most adopters a form of value storage. However, cryptocurrencies are rapidly becoming a medium of value exchange, too (“digital money”). Bitcoin ATMs are appearing globally, for example. In Ireland, about 120,000 people in Ireland now own a cryptocurrency, a 300 per cent increase in the last four years. And yet, that basic usability heuristic of using plain language to communicate a concept even to experts to enable ease of use and adoption has already gone out the window.

The list of Bitcoin-friendly countries contains some surprises (Estonia is number one), and includes locations where English is very often not a mother tongue (although development tools and coding platforms are in English). We cannot be dismissive of the significant regulatory and security aspects of cryptocurrencies for now. But localization challenges are worth planning for now if cryptocurrencies are to move to the mainstream beyond those Silicon Valley types and their friends.

It’s likely, of course, that we will also see traditional finance, banking, Fintech, and cryptocurrencies all interact with more solidity in the future, adding to the need for more localization creativity.

Cryptocurrency Disruption Includes Language

At times, it’s hard to accept that the localization maxim English Is Just Another Language could apply in a cryptocurrency space that seems to have disrupted the notion of the English language itself. James Joyce might be proud of this kind of word invention, and of course it’s all a matter of context. But I remain gobsmacked by some of the terms I come across. It’s clear that lack of localization is a serious barrier to cryptocurrency adoption when even someone who has  worked in digital tech for three decades is struggling.

I need to learn that lingo though, as Dublin seems to be place it’s all happening for those cryptocurrency and blockchain ambitions.

Ah, the irony of that word, block, when it comes to getting your head around cryptocurrencies.

More About Cryptocurrencies?

 

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Ultan Ó Broin (@localization), is an independent UX consultant. With three decades of UX and L10n experience and outreach, he specializes in helping people ensure their global digital transformation makes sense culturally and also reflects how users behave locally.

Any views expressed are his own. Especially the ones you agree with.

Blue, Gorm, Elektrisches Blau: David Bowie in Irish and Transcreation

Localization Culture, Travel and Culture

Táimid ann sa mhóimint dhraíochtach seo
Sin é an stuif as a bhfitear brionglóidí  . . .  *

I’m mega-fan of the music of the late David Bowie. I love everything he did from Hunky Dory (1971) up to his Lodger (1979) album (you can keep the rest). His so-called Berlin Trilogy is amongst my favorite recordings; I always go to some of his old Berlin haunts whenever I find myself in the Hauptstadt.

Indeed, Berlin is the European city for David Bowie fans to visit, even more so than his native London.

Plaque outside Hauptstraße 155, Berlin commemorating David Bowie. (Image: Ultan Ó Broin)

Plaque outside Hauptstraße 155, Berlin commemorating David Bowie. (Image source: Ultan Ó Broin)

Yet, Bowie didn’t speak German and often seemed aloof from real words on the Berlin streets.

Much of the heavy language lifting of David Bowie’s time in Berlin was done for him by his long-time assistant Coco Schwab and I even recall an interview with the man himself a few years ago when we went on about living in Charlottenburg (he lived in Schöneberg). Then we have the goofed spelling of the song title Neuköln (it should be Neukölln) on the “Heroes” album, his pronunciation of KaDeWe on one of his last recordings Where Are We Now? (2013) is definitely not that of a Berliner, and the German language version (‘translated’ by Antonia Maaß) of his most iconic song “Heroes” (“Helden“) is regarded as “odd” (“Und die Scham fiel auf ihre Seite“?) by German Bowie fans, who generally much prefer the English language version.

That said, David Bowie’s ‘heroic’ contribution to Berlin was recognized on his passing.

German Foreign Office Tweet recognizing David Bowie's contribution to the end of Der Mauer (The Berlin Wall)

German Foreign Office Tweet recognizing David Bowie’s contribution to bringing down der Berliner Mauer (The Berlin Wall)

But, does David Bowie’s work even warrant any translation from English? And, if so, do we care how it is translated?

I recently attended a performance of David Bowie’s songs in Irish (Gaeilge) which was held in the Pavilion Theatre in my native Dún Laoghaire: Réaltnach: An Tionscadal DAVID BOWIE (Starman: The DAVID BOWIE Project). The performance was by Liam Ó Maonlaí  and the Brad Pitt Light Orchestra and friends.

Bowie Realtneach project. Source: IMRAN/Pavilion Theatre

The David Bowie Réaltneach project. Image source: IMRAM/Pavilion Theatre

On the BBC News, Liam Ó Maonlaí said, “(David) Bowie’s work is so perfect it doesn’t need translating, but as a Gaeilgeoir or Irish speaker . . . (I) couldn’t pass up on this opportunity.”

I had arrived back from Berlin that afternoon, and I wondered whether the Irish language project that evening would work or not.

It did.

David Bowie’s songs were crafted beautifully as Gaeilge by a skilled writer and linguist in his own right, Gabriel Rosenstock. You can read some of the Irish-language versions of the David Bowie’s songs by Gabriel Rosenstock on his blog here, including a version of Bowie’s last work Blackstar (Dúréalt).

I am not sure whether the term transcreation is completely correct to use to describe Gabriel Rosenstock’s work in this context (normally we think of it being about marketing and branding), but I think it’s reasonable to say Gabriel Rosenstock re-created something new yet immediately familiar using the skill and talent of a great translator and artist together.

True, at times I thought some stuff I heard sounded a little bit hokey, such as the version of Sound and Vision (Fuaim is Fís) from the Low album (1977):

Gorm, gorm, aibhléis-ghorm
Sin é dath mo sheomra
Im’ chónaí ann
Gorm, gorm

Blue, blue, electric blue
That’s the color of my room
Where I will live
Blue, blue

(David Bowie / Gabriel Rosenstock)

But then, there’s hokey . . . and there’s hokey . . . 

However, when it came to Liam Ó Maonlaí’s performance of the Irish-language version of Win from the “plastic soul” Young Americans  album (1975) I could see tears in the eyes of audience members. You can listen to Liam Ó Maonlaí singing it here on RTÉ radio (about 6 minutes into the recording of the programme).

This was a simply astounding song in its own right. The emotion in the song, the lyrical flow of the words, and the passion put into the delivery by Liam Ó Maonlaí all resonated deeply with the audience, myself included. I came away feeling that the Irish version delivered this way might actually be better than the original English version on the album.

The performance also reminded me of what a beautiful language Irish can be, and the tragedy of how it has become something so difficult to use in even ordinary, human ways for most people in Ireland.

In the hands of culturally adept multilingual artists (Liam Ó Maonlaí and Gabriel Rosenstock are well qualified in this regard), I’d argue that even the most iconic songs, and perhaps other works of art, can be performed or communicated in any language. This is of course, a matter of much more than simply translation, but then when it comes to communicating human emotion, it always is, isn’t it?

Ultan Ó Broin outside the Pavilion Theatre in Dún Laoghaire, County Dublin Ireland (#selfie)

Ultan Ó Broin outside the Pavilion Theatre in Dún Laoghaire, County Dublin Ireland (#selfie)

A finer example of artistic transcreation I defy you to find. It’s the stuff of which dreams are woven.

That said, you may know of other great music translations or transcreations. Let us know in the comments.

* Here are we, one magical moment, such is the stuff

From where dreams are woven . . .

 

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Ultan Ó Broin (@localization), is an independent UX consultant. With three decades of UX and L10n experience and outreach, he specializes in helping people ensure their global digital transformation makes sense culturally and also reflects how users behave locally.

Any views expressed are his own. Especially the ones you agree with.

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Localization World Dublin 2014

Language Industry News and Events

Proud to say that Localization World came to my home city, Dublin, in June 2014. And boy, what an event. I am told that there were 650 attendees. That makes it the biggest Localization World event yet.

Dublin’s a great place to visit, as well as to stage events in, so let’s see more industry events coming soon.

The Stavros S Niarchos came to Dublin's River Liffey in June, 2014. So did Localization World at the Dublin Convention Centre (in the background).

The Stavros S Niarchos came to Dublin’s River Liffey in June, 2014. So did Localization World at the Dublin Convention Centre (in the background).

The online conference program reveals the richness of content and diversity of speakers. I flew in and presented too, explaining how developers can make great UIs for enterprise apps by following some simple visual design rules. So, there is no need to go to art school for four years. A copy of my presentation is on SlideShare (yes, it’s non-downloadable. To download, well, you’ll just have to sign up for the conference in future, yeah?).

At least one of these people hasn't aged a day in 20 years, while the other is now channeling an inner Keith Richards. Or something.

At least one of these people hasn’t aged a day in 20 years, while the other is now channeling an inner Keith Richards. Or something.

In all, a great event. Watch out for more coverage in a forthcoming issue of MultiLingual magazine and check out the great pictures on Facebook.

Smart of the organizers to get #LocWorld clear of Dublin before real waffling started, too. Who needs PowerPoint?

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Ultan Ó Broin (@localization), is an independent UX consultant. With three decades of UX and L10n experience and outreach, he specializes in helping people ensure their global digital transformation makes sense culturally and also reflects how users behave locally.

Any views expressed are his own. Especially the ones you agree with.

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And This One Time, At Mashup Camp Dublin …

Language Industry News and Events

I was very impressed with the UnConference section of Mashup Camp, held at the Guinness Brewery Storehouse in Dublin. The format offers great potential for sharing of knowledge, and a challenge to the more traditional conference formats.

Mashup Camp consisted of an initial 1.5 days of Mashup University, which, to be honest, was similar to many other conferences in our industry, mixing non-specific marketing and sales pitches with more brazen product promotion. I did learn a lot about Yahoo!’s Developer Network and what they offered, and loved the PowerPoint-ridicule format of the presentation by AOL, delivered without speaking.

However, the bulk of the balance had a sameness that was all too familiar. The presentation by Salesforce prompted some interesting questions about internationalized and localized mashups (although, er, no-one knew of any examples), but other than that, such topics remained well off the radar at the University section of the event.

Furthermore, the contributions from AOL, IBM, Microsoft et al had problems relating mashup use cases to Irish scenarios, and we were left to ponder the localized possibilities of the demoed examples relying on ZIP codes and NYPD crime reports, 3D virtual maps of London, iPhones (still not available in Ireland), and so on.

The selling and pitching over, we then moved into a more interesting format where the participants proposed topics they were interested in exploring (suggestions taped to a wall in a very non-technical way), and participants were free to attend what appealed to them.

A full list of the different discussions held over the 1.5 days of the Camp proper is here.

I prepared an ad hoc presentation on global mashup usability – including such areas as user experience, localization, internationalization, and accessibility. The gathering of about 20 that it attracted provided for a lively, candid exchange of experience, tips, ideas, and resources. I’ve captured as much as I can in the final presentation, now available online (Google Docs Drive Presentation format).

Other events including speedgeeking (I declined), mashup competitions, and a social evening downtown. There is more MSDN blog coverage here.

So, whatever about the promise of mashups (there is, but there are many issues, a lot of which – legal, security, quality, accessibility, internationalization – even making money – are not new), I think there is great promise for the UnConferencing approach. Will someone dare do a complete localization conference this way?

That said, the business challenge of funding such an event and participants obtaining travel authorization from a boss for a camp with no agenda fixed in advance remains another one!

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Ultan Ó Broin (@localization), is an independent UX consultant. With three decades of UX and L10n experience and outreach, he specializes in helping people ensure their global digital transformation makes sense culturally and also reflects how users behave locally.

Any views expressed are his own. Especially the ones you agree with.

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