Tag: gamification

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The deep dish on Papa John’s approach to in-country review

Translation

Papa John’s ICR

Hank Enright Papa John’s ICR

I write a column in the MultiLingual print edition where clients share why they do — and don’t — buy professional translation. This issue, which just went live, features Hank Enright, director of international training at Papa John’s, an international pizza chain based in Louisville, Kentucky.

While discussing how Papa John’s chooses translation partners, which you can read about in the print edition, Enright additionally gave us an inside look at the company’s unique approach to in-country review (ICR). Papa John’s gamifies ICR, offering employees virtual cash for every error found.

Papa John’s gamifies ICR, offering employees virtual cash for every error found. Click To Tweet

Raised in Mexico to American parents, Enright considers himself fluent in English and Spanish. So he oversees translation between the two, performing a lot of the work himself. He’s says he’s not the only employee the company has translating, though: “When available,” Papa John’s relies on “internal resources to either translate, edit or proof content” into multiple languages: Enright translates Spanish, the company’s Beijing team reviews and edits Simplified Chinese, and the company’s new international business director handles Korean.

“For other languages — based on the volume to be translated or reviewed — we have had our native-speaking franchise business consultants provide feedback,” Enright says. “Where we do not have a native speaker, we have leveraged and partnered with the in-country franchise team as appropriate, and even on occasion spouses who have worked in the food and hospitality industry.”

“When you translate your own materials internally, you are your own customer, provider and editor,” he continues. “It can be tempting to not include a feedback cycle.” So Enright developed a reward system that encourages employees to find each other’s mistakes.

Eligible content includes menus, box labeling, leaflets, websites, collateral for new market openings and other marketing material. Documents are translated by the local franchise or marketing team, which then challenges Enright to find errors and typos. When Papa John’s expanded into Guatemala, Enright earned eight quetzales (around $1) from errors in a menu board panel. “I have yet to return to Guatemala to collect,” he jokes.

According to Enright, it works — for Guatemalan Spanish, at least. “By partnering with the local franchisee on material review, we launched the brand with coherent and properly translated materials, which is a win-win. Thanks to our expanding market needs and addition of new staff, we now use standardized templates to reduce or eliminate my well-intended revenue stream.”

Of course, paying employees to find errors in translation could incorrectly and negatively skew a client’s perception of translation quality: the method rewards quantity, after all, with no reward when errors aren’t found. And Papa John’s has systematically had a hard time finding a translation provider it’s pleased with — one reason Enright gives for why he translates so much personally.

To the company’s credit, though, one past provider made obvious gaffes — like translating “Give it your guts; it ain’t harder than that” as “Give your matured guts, anything harder than that.” In instances like these, Enright says, “It takes just as much time to edit a translation than to do it all internally.”

Regardless of who translates, he adds, “If not cross-checked, you can end up lost in translation or with an entirely different meaning.” Like any client, Papa John’s wants translations that are industry-aware and brand-specific. When the source content’s tricky, Enright says, “A translator can put forth their best effort but if a native speaking, subject matter expert does not proof and verify that the meaning behind the words is interpreted correctly, you will end up losing credibility and transferring incomplete or incorrect information.”

Papa John’s may have stopped offering staff money for uncovered mistakes, but that doesn’t mean the game isn’t still on for Enright: “I still have native speaking Spanish speakers and others reach out to me for translating, edit, proofing or correcting in Spanish and English…I take great pride and ownership in reviewing, correcting and editing Spanish language material. It is critical that the end product facing the franchisee or customer reflects professionalism and — as much as possible — does not seem as if it were translated from English.”

However your company handles ICR, Enright stresses that “proofing and editing [are] often not given the importance and time [they] deserve. The feedback cycle to the translator is vital to increasing the quality of future translations!”

Learn more about Papa John’s translation process and purchasing decisions in the current issue of MultiLingual.

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Terena Bell is the senior director of communication for Lionbridge. She previously worked as an independent journalist who writes for The Atlantic, Washington Post, Fast Company and others. She is former CEO of In Every Language.

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How to Use the HTML5 Translate Attribute: A Translatability Best Practice

Personalization and Design, Translation Technology

HTML5 introduces a translate attribute that allows fine-grained control over what content should be translated, or not. Richard Ishida of the W3C has all the details of the attribute and its applicability, as well as some interesting insights into how Bing Translator and Google Translate deal with the translatability of content issue.

Here’s an example of the translate attribute’s use, taken from Richard’s blog (the HTML5 spec’s global attributes section has another other nice example, see the Bee Game.):

<p>Click the Resume button on the Status Display or the
<span translate="no">CONTINUE</span> button
on the printer panel.</p>

See how the word CONTINUE is made non-translatable using the translate attribute’s value set to “no”? Blimey! However, there are times when CONTINUE might need to be translated. So, flip that puppy to “yes”.

This HTML5 attribute is a very welcome addition to the content creation and translation tools world, sure.  But, it is very welcome for other reasons too.

This is a time of new interactions and emerging platforms that challenge the established desktop and website norms of what should be translated or not. Mobile, augmented reality, gamification, and other trends, all challenge established norms of content rules. So too, is it a time when companies redefine themselves, cross over, and promote their own design guidance as a differentiator in the market. Oracle, for example, likes to say “Software, Hardware. Complete” so content needs to cross-reference many deliverables. SAP, as another example, recently launched an app in the consumer space (available in German and English) that may require a different style of content and translation from the enterprise applications space. Android has released user experience (UX)  guidance of its own, and so on.

I previously raised such translatability issues in my Don’t Translate: Won’t Translate blog post.  I chipped into the [Bug 12417] discussion about the attribute’s development, too.

Using content to convey a translation instruction, by making a piece of text all uppercase for example, is not a best practice. It is a UX failure, makes personalization and customization difficult, and assumes the consumer of the content is a second-class stakeholder. Frankly, it is also very dangerous. Can you imagine if software developers used text that way in their code, rather than relying on the program logic?

As for the time-honored method of writing a translation note, or description, telling a translator that some content should not be translated, or should be, well such approaches just ain’t reliable or scalable, are they?

Now, there is a clear best practice to follow (and adapt for other formats). The HTML5 translate attribute educates content developers that the best practice for indicating whether content should be translated or not is through the use of markup (or metadata), and not through how the content is written. Translation tools should update to the HTML5 spec requirements and process this attribute asap.

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Ultan Ó Broin (@localization), is an independent UX consultant. With three decades of UX and L10n experience and outreach, he specializes in helping people ensure their global digital transformation makes sense culturally and also reflects how users behave locally.

Any views expressed are his own. Especially the ones you agree with.

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My Wishlist for Language Industry Conversation in 2012

Language in Business, Language in the News, Language Industry News and Events

Here’s what I would like to see as the key conversation topics in 2012:

Even the coffee is gamified. Acknowledgement @noelruane. Check out the Guardian article Dublin's Frothing with Tech Fever: www.guardian.co.uk

Even the coffee is gamified. Acknowledgement @noelruane. Check out the Guardian article Dublin's Frothing with Tech Fever: www.guardian.co.uk


In general, I would like to see language–and language technology, especially–move towards realistic end user and economic considerations, be they understanding motivation, usage, or interacting with individuals to part with their time or cash. Anything I can do to help make that happen, I will.

Don’t mind where–or how–these topics are discussed, provided the conversation reaches new ears. How disappointing to see how the energy around language issues (however broadly or narrowly you define it) continues to be mostly clustered around a relatively small set of conferences and publications (industry and academic) with basically the same highfalutin audience. Let’s see some traction at places such as SxSWi, Next Berlin, CHI, the Gamification Summit, and so on.

You may know of others outlets or opportunities for engagement, or have your own wishes. Find the comments.

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+ posts

Ultan Ó Broin (@localization), is an independent UX consultant. With three decades of UX and L10n experience and outreach, he specializes in helping people ensure their global digital transformation makes sense culturally and also reflects how users behave locally.

Any views expressed are his own. Especially the ones you agree with.

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