Tag: SaaS

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Haven’t an Iota About Fintech Localization? Try Cryptocurrencies

Localization, Localization Technology

Money, Money, Money Meets Its Waterloo

Apologies to ABBA fans about the cheesy introduction. But, mamma mia we need to talk about cryptocurrencies!

Lattés with your Litecoin? Crypto Café in Dublin, accepts cryptocurrencies and hard cash. (Image: Ultan Ó Broin)

Lattés with your Litecoin? Crypto Café in Dublin, Ireland accepts cryptocurrencies and hard cash. (Image: Ultan Ó Broin)

The Chips Are Down For Fintech

I enjoyed a must-read Medium article from Graham Rigby of Iota Localisation Services about the challenges of Fintech localization. Graham talks about how Fintech localization is different from ERP financial or vertical banking localization. He also tells us how a changing business environment means localization providers need to be agile, collaborative, and flexible:

“The way financial products are sold, communicated, and presented in the current market mean that linguists who have spent 20 years translating mortgage terms might not be best equipped to deal with the style and nuance of the text in a money transfer app.”

Indeed, the very notion of a “bank” itself has changed: Deutsche Bank in Berlin is now into Kaffee und Kuchen for the hip and happening people of the Hauptstadt.  ImaginBank from Spain is aimed at snombies, sorry, I mean the mobile generation.

And now, cryptocurrency localization is upon us, and that requires linguistic domain expertise too. Ironically, there is even a cryptocurrency called … Iota (designed for use with the Internet of Things [IOT]).

Oh No, It’s ONO!

I’ve changed career in the last few months, now offering digital transformation consultancy to established and startup ventures seeking to design the right digital thing the right way and to be ready to go global. I’ve been diving into the cryptocurrency space and grappling with the new ideas, concepts, and a new strange language that comes with it.

Cryptocurrency word cloud: Has language itself been disrupted by innovation? (Wordle by Ultan Ó Broin)

Cryptocurrency word cloud: Has language itself been disrupted by innovation? (Wordle by Ultan Ó Broin)

This is about much more than the Bitcoin and blockchain buzzwords du jour that people throw about without actually having an iota what these mean or indeed possible uses (blockchain, for example is behind the Chinese social media platform, ONO).

Mental “Block” About Cryptocurrencies?

If you want to explore this decentralised space further, there’s a blog series worth reading from Genson C. Glier on blockchain, Bitcoin, Ethereum, and cryptocurrency. I also recommend  this podcast from Tim Ferriss that covers all you were afraid to ask about, although some of terms and concepts will make your head spin (cheat list: jump to the “Show Notes” on the podcast). Try understanding these terms: Miner, Smart Contract, Daap, Truffle, Ganache, Hashcash, “Wet” Code, “Dry” Code, ICO, Metamask, and Gas.

Advertisement for eToro cyrptocurrency platform on Dublin public transport. Interest in cryptocurrencies has increased greatly in Ireland.

Advertisement for the eToro cryptocurrency platform on Dublin public transport. Interest in cryptocurrencies has increased greatly in Ireland. (Image: Ultan Ó Broin)

Although many people and institutions are rightly cautious about cryptocurrencies, they are a “thing” now and attitudes are shifting from suspicion to curiosity Providing localization of the conversation around cryptocurrencies and non-developer facing terms would be a great starting point to increase familiarity and adoption

Providing localization of the conversation around cryptocurrencies and non-developer facing terms would be a great starting point to increase familiarity and adoption Click To Tweet.

Read the small print. Consumer warning about cryptocurrencies lack regulation and protection on an eToro advertisement in Dublin, Ireland. (Image: Ultan Ó Broin)

Read the fine print. Consumer warning about cryptocurrency lack of regulation and protection on an eToro advertisement in Dublin, Ireland. (Image: Ultan Ó Broin)

Cryptocurrency Localization Needed

Generally, cryptocurrencies are for most adopters a form of value storage. However, cryptocurrencies are rapidly becoming a medium of value exchange, too (“digital money”). Bitcoin ATMs are appearing globally, for example. In Ireland, about 120,000 people in Ireland now own a cryptocurrency, a 300 per cent increase in the last four years. And yet, that basic usability heuristic of using plain language to communicate a concept even to experts to enable ease of use and adoption has already gone out the window.

The list of Bitcoin-friendly countries contains some surprises (Estonia is number one), and includes locations where English is very often not a mother tongue (although development tools and coding platforms are in English). We cannot be dismissive of the significant regulatory and security aspects of cryptocurrencies for now. But localization challenges are worth planning for now if cryptocurrencies are to move to the mainstream beyond those Silicon Valley types and their friends.

It’s likely, of course, that we will also see traditional finance, banking, Fintech, and cryptocurrencies all interact with more solidity in the future, adding to the need for more localization creativity.

Cryptocurrency Disruption Includes Language

At times, it’s hard to accept that the localization maxim English Is Just Another Language could apply in a cryptocurrency space that seems to have disrupted the notion of the English language itself. James Joyce might be proud of this kind of word invention, and of course it’s all a matter of context. But I remain gobsmacked by some of the terms I come across. It’s clear that lack of localization is a serious barrier to cryptocurrency adoption when even someone who has  worked in digital tech for three decades is struggling.

I need to learn that lingo though, as Dublin seems to be place it’s all happening for those cryptocurrency and blockchain ambitions.

Ah, the irony of that word, block, when it comes to getting your head around cryptocurrencies.

More About Cryptocurrencies?

 

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Ultan Ó Broin (@localization), is an independent UX consultant. With three decades of UX and L10n experience and outreach, he specializes in helping people ensure their global digital transformation makes sense culturally and also reflects how users behave locally.

Any views expressed are his own. Especially the ones you agree with.

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Considerations in choosing an enterprise-level TMS

Translation Technology

Although in a previous article entitled “Disruptive innovation in translation management systems” I asserted that the software as a service (SaaS) delivery model has produced great end results, I do not recommend buyers concern themselves too much with buzz words (or in this case, acronyms) such as SaaS when selecting a translation management system (TMS). It is buyer criteria that matters when choosing a TMS, and each situation is different. With that in mind, let’s take a look at considerations in choosing a solution for enterprise buyers.

It can be difficult to put the variety of offerings into context simply by studying and comparing marketing materials or feature lists. Begin instead with a list of your own criteria. Enterprise customers may be interested in TMS for a variety of reasons, including automation, cost savings, transparency, process ownership, branding consistency across business units, improved context, increased speed of workflow, multivendor support and the list goes on. How do you choose?Most language service providers (LSPs) are using solutions behind the scenes already. Click To Tweet

Identify your deal-breakers, your must-haves and your nice-to-haves. Think about not just immediate needs, but potential future needs. Then engage technology vendors to ask how they can address your particular needs. And by the way, you are bound to encounter some exciting functionality you had not imagined or realized you needed along the way!

Here is a list of considerations in choosing a TMS for enterprise, in no particular order. Some items in this list touch only lightly on subject matter that can go quite deep, and might prompt more questions. Please reach out if there is a particular topic you would like to see covered in more detail.

And now some food for thought:

What file types require support? Consult TMS manuals for the list of supported file types and, importantly, get a Statement of Work (SOW) for any file types not supported out-of-the-box. Pricing for this type of customization (custom parsers) can range anywhere from hundreds of dollars to tens of thousands of dollars. Without a parser for your file type you are opening yourself up to hourly engineering fees for repeated manual pre- and post-processing tasks.

Do you require any level of customization? Consider requesting an SOW for some small piece of customization in order to gauge the cost of professional services. Keep in mind per-day or per-hour costs are less meaningful when one technology vendor would take three weeks to accomplish what another can do in five days.

Are you intending to process software files containing metadata such as character limits, string identifiers or developer comments? If so ask your technology provider if the tool can make use of the metadata and ask for a demonstration using your own files.

What technical issues do you wish to solve? If you have specific reoccurring issues in your translation deliveries, make a list of those for discussion with technology vendors. As an example, here are some I have endeavored to address in the past:

  • Regression bugs due to inability to store multiple translations for matching source text with varying translations, including
    1. Plurals, which were recognized as repeat text, rather than distinct translation memory (TM) entries
    2. English words that can have multiple translations, depending on context (e.g. “Free” as in “free disk space”, and “Free” as in “at no cost”)
    3. Source text that can require shortened translation in some cases, but not others, depending on placement in a mobile application.
  • Inability to in-context extract and match software strings that have changed order and general lack of ID-based matching.
  • Inability to see developer comments in the translation environment.
  • Lack of native support for some of our main file types.

Be wary of sales pitches involving percentage discounts based on consolidation of tools and language services with a single vendor. Click To TweetDo you have a strict budget? You may be able to immediately eliminate certain solutions based solely on price.

Most language service providers (LSPs) are using solutions behind the scenes already. Does your LSP offer a one-size-fits-all solution or have they selected a solution with your particular needs in mind? In the latter case it might be sensible to consider adopting the solution they have selected for you.

Do you have the in-house expertise to understand the nitty-gritty details around the process and tooling? If not, you can compensate for that by consulting unbiased sources, such as other enterprise customers and tool-agnostic LSPs or independent consultants who have experience with a variety of solutions. Do not rely solely on salespeople.

By that same token, be wary of sales pitches involving percentage discounts based on consolidation of tools and language services with a single vendor. The complexity of TM leverage statistics and the hourly charges associated with localization make percentage discounts offered by LSPs that control processes you do not understand pretty meaningless, particularly if you are locking yourself into a situation where you have nothing with which to compare costs and no direct access to or understanding of the data.

Adopting tools that are not the best fit for your content will result in increased language services fees, either due to inability to optimize TM leverage or due to repetitive manual processes that incur engineering fees. Some of these inefficiencies will be difficult if not impossible to measure after implementation. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Avoid potential conflicts of interest whenever possible.

Are you using multiple vendors? An LSP-agnostic solution will give you the maximum flexibility to use any LSP or translator you would like and to move projects between vendors as needed without incurring leverage loss or disrupting processes.

Do you want a hosted system or will you host your own?

Are your development teams using agile? It’s possible to implement a TMS that allows for constant updates, even for files already out for translation.

Check on the ability of the system to provide context during translation. Can the solution display screenshots? WYSIWYG? Ask for a demonstration. The more contextual information you can provide during translation, the fewer the issues you have to fix during review or linguistic testing.

What content management systems (CMSs) might require support now or in the future? Even if CMS admins are not immediately planning to connect to your TMS, you should check for connectors, keeping as many doors open for other organizations across your company as possible, since centralization of TM assets has many benefits.

Are you interested in automation now or potentially in the future? Make sure an API is available and run it by your engineering team if possible. If you plan to outsource engineering work, make sure the cost of professional services is within your scope. There are also third-party developers available with localization expertise.

How long would it take to implement the TMS? It’s a question well worth asking. Hint: some take months to get up and running while others take days.

Do you use software with string IDs? ID-based matching is a must-have for anyone translating software files containing unique string identifiers.

Do you require third party linguistic verification? If so, check to see if the workflow can send a single project between multiple vendors or other users, such as in-country reviewers. Some systems simply cannot be configured to send a single project between multiple LSPs.

Pricing models vary greatly. Some pricing is posted openly on websites. However, some pricing is not as transparent and you will need to request a quote. I have encountered all of the following pricing models:

  • Number of languages (rare, but it has happened)
  • Base cost + throughput
  • Number of licenses
  • Number of concurrent licenses (simultaneous logins)

The level of support included is extremely important. Contact other clients, if you can, and ask about their level of satisfaction with the support.

  • Does support include TM imports?
  • Does support include TM alignments?
  • Does support include filter creation?
  • How quickly does support respond?
  • How user friendly is the ticketing system?
  • Pricing for support

Do translators and/or vendors have to purchase licenses to work with the tool? Is there a free desktop client available for the tool?

What will be the cost of the initial migration effort? Most of us have existing TM by the time we are selecting a TMS. There may be a cost associated with migrating your existing translation assets if you require outside help.

Ask the technology vendor about their favorite “cool” features. See what they have to offer that you may not have even imagined.

Test for TM leverage loss and consult the technology vendor about possibilities for mitigation. A certain level of leverage loss for docs is usually inevitable, but worst-case scenario is hopefully no more than 20%, and ideally much lower. Leverage loss for docs should be carefully evaluated. I have seen as much as 40% salvaged from a handful of global search and replaces in TM. For software files with string identifiers, alignments should be done and zero leverage loss can be expected.

Run a pilot project before you commit!

This list is not comprehensive, and not all items are critical for every enterprise, but I hope it gives you some food for thought when selecting an enterprise-level TMS. It is difficult to find a perfect solution, but if you plan carefully you might come pretty close, considering the variety of offerings now available.

Implementing a TMS is no small task and it would serve you well to engage your LSPs early in the process. Check at both the management and at the project team level to make sure you have your LSPs’ support before you implement a TMS. Be open to making adjustments if an LSP is resistant rather than collaborative, or if an LSP is not able to take ownership of and demonstrate accountability for new processes. As with any big change in process, there is a possibility it may not work for everyone who signed on under different circumstances. I guarantee there are LSPs eager and able to help you succeed.

Happy TMSing!

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Jenny Reid recently joined Guidewire Software as a senior localization project manager and is scrum product owner for tooling to support continuous localization and contextual translation. She has worked in a variety of localization roles, including QA testing, linguistic quality management, localization engineering, vendor management and project management. She has ten years of experience in TMS implementation and administration.

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Conversational UI Language Design at LocWorld35

Language in Business, Language in the News, Personalization and Design, Translation Technology

Oracle Applications User Experience (OAUX) team member (and Microsoft Alum) Karen Scipi (@karenscipi) presented on the subject of Conversational UI in the Enterprise at #LocWorld35 Silicon Valley. Karen covered the central importance of  language design for chatbots and other conversational user interfaces (CUIs) for global work use cases.

Karen Scipi presenting on Conversational UIs in the Enterprise at Localization World in Silicon Valley 2017 (Image credit: Olga)

Karen Scipi presenting on Conversational UIs in the Enterprise at Localization World in Silicon Valley 2017 (Image credit: Olga)

Karen even developed two chatbot integrations for Slack introducing her topic. One was in English, the other was in Italian.

Italian LocWorld Chatbot Conversation Example

Italian LocWorld Chatbot Conversation Example (Source: Karen Scipi)

What’s a Conversational UI?

Chatbots and the alike are a very hot topic, wrapped up in the artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML), natural language processing (NLP), and robotics part of technology’s evolution. However, user experience design insight and an empathy for how people interact with each other through technology in work, at play, or in everyday life makes the difference when creating a great user experience in any language.What could be more 'natural' than talking to a computer? Click To Tweet

CUI means we moved from a “user”-centric concept of design to a human-centric one. After all, what could be more “natural” that talking to a computer? Both humans and computers “converse” in dialog, and it’s the language design knowledge for such a conversation that’s critical to delivering a natural, human-like interaction between the two.

Examples of CUIs include Facebook Messenger, Slack bots, TelegramAmazon Echo and Alexa devices, and so on. Interaction can be via voice, SMS messaging, typing text on a keyboard, and so on.

In the enterprise there are a broad range of considerations and stakeholders that localization and UX pros must to consider. Fundamentally though, enterprise CUIs are about increasing participation in the user experience of work, making things simpler.

 

Oracle Conversational UI image showing the interaction and participation of humans and the cloud - in any language! (Source: OAUX)

Oracle Conversational UI image showing the interaction and participation of humans and the cloud – in any language! (Source: OAUX)

Localization of Conversational UIs

To an extent, the localization or language part of the CUI interaction is determined by the NLP support of the chatbot or other platform used: what languages it supports, how good the AI and ML parts are, and so on. However, language skills are at the heart of the conversational UI design, whether it’s composing that  user storyline for design flows or creating the prompts and messages seen by the human involved.

This kind of communication skill is much in-demand: It is a special type of talent: a mix of technical writing, film script or creative writing, transcreation, and interpreting. It’s a domain insight that gets right down to the nitty-gritty of replicating and handling how humans really speak and write: slang, errors, typos, warts and all. CUI language designers must even decide how emoji and personality can or should be localized in different versions of a chatbot.

Where’s the Conversation Headed?

The conversational UI market is growing globally as messenger apps take over. Localization and language pros cannot ignore the conversational UI space.

Karen will be speaking next at the Seattle Localization User Group (SLUG) in December (2017) about Conversational UIs in the Enterprise.Localization and language pros cannot ignore the conversational UI space. Click To Tweet

 

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Ultan Ó Broin (@localization), is an independent UX consultant. With three decades of UX and L10n experience and outreach, he specializes in helping people ensure their global digital transformation makes sense culturally and also reflects how users behave locally.

Any views expressed are his own. Especially the ones you agree with.

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Visual Composer makes Citizen Developer a Citoyen du Monde

Personalization and Design

Interesting to see that Facebook has announced the launch of a multilingual composer tool that enables users to post their status updates in different languages so that their friends and followers can see the update in only their preferred language. 

This notion of composers is not new, of course. They’ve been around for a while and often encountered in the e-commerce and SaaS spaceAmazon lets sellers create, customize, and brand their own online stores for example. What is interesting from a user experience perspective is that composers are part of the emergence of a global citizen developer role, a role that now finds itself responsible for tailoring the language in the UI of cloud applications.

Oracle SaaS Release 10 in Dutch. Language changes can be made with a visual composer tool.

Oracle SaaS Release 10 in Dutch. Language changes can be made with a visual composer tool.

Oracle SaaS Release 10 in Dutch. Language changes can be made with composer tools.

The term citizen developer itself presents some difficulty and in many ways is a contradiction in terms. Nobody seriously expects governments, multinational corporations, and bodies of that nature to hand over their implementation or SaaS customization to “citizens” with basic “Hello, World” programming chops.

Instead, think of citizen developers as more about the empowerment of software owners themselves to make their own modifications, be they branding, extensions, localisation, or translation changes. It’s all about enabling customers to take real ownership of their cloud software, without resorting to making source code changes or needing any real software development skills. It’s a low-code or no-code approach, if you like. In other words, citizen development abstracts away the complexity of programming and integration so that user experience can be tailored to your heart’s desire as if by magic. The tool du jour for the job of making your own digital world? Composers. The very word has an element of artistry to it.

Composers are more vital tools than ever now with the advent of SaaS, be they in the hands of the customers, implementation partners, user experience specialists, or design consultancies who don’t usually have, or need, deep-drive software development skills yet know what the desired result should be.

Sandbox-based composers enable Oracle partners, for example, to make SaaS user experience changes quickly and safely for customers, freeing up their own development resources for more critical tasks. Given that 80% of enterprise software applications require customization of some sort, composers are a key part of the partner world’s implementation and maintenance toolkit.

In the multilingual enterprise space, for example, a partner might be asked by a customer to make language changes across their suite of applications quickly and securely, ensuring that the changes are made in just the right places. That’s what’s happened in one case where Oracle PartnerNetwork member and UX champ central Certus Solutions was asked to change the out of the box German translation for performance to another word shown in Oracle’s simplified UI for SaaS. The customer wanted to use the English word instead. Language is a critical part of the UX; like everything else it must be designed.

German Simplified UI customization done using a visual cloud composer

German Simplified UI customization done using a visual cloud composer

If you need the word Performance for your user experience; then so be it! German simplified UI SaaS customization by Certus Solutions (now Accenture) using a visual composer tool.

Other examples might be the desire to change all those U.S. English spellings to the U.K. variant; or to make changes in language that reflect how customers actually structure and run their business. For example, employee might be changed to partner. The label My Team is often changed to My Department, a language change that doesn’t even require a composer right away but can be done at the personalization level with just a click and overtype if you have the right security settings! Some previous translations for the word worker have proven problematic in Arabic, Brazilian Portuguese, and French, requiring modification for certain customers (let’s not go there). There are lots of examples where composers could be used to change the language of an application or service.

Autumn? Fall? Who cares! Change the language in the SaaS simplified UI easily with a sandbox-safe visual composer.Autumn? Fall? Who cares! Change the language in the SaaS simplified UI easily with a sandbox-safe visual composer.

What is of interest is that very few of these composer tools use localization industry standard procedures or formats and yet seem the better for it. For example, although language changes are made directly into resource bundles or XLIFF files, they are done so at run-time, eliminating context problems. Composer tools rarely have any complex terminology look-up capability, offer TBX support, have language QA features other than spell checkers, and nor do they use translation memory or support TMX. Why not? Well, these things aren’t needed by customers or partners right now and probably would just complicate things.

Perhaps as composers evolve this kind of “traditional translation” functionality might appear. But only if the customers and partners demand it.

Allowing business users to make a language change themselves is more cost-effective, faster, and more secure solution than doing a retranslation or taking a UX hit by deciding to leave the language as is. The result is a better customer experience, faster.

Will translators find themselves out of a job as a result?

Unlikely.

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Ultan Ó Broin (@localization), is an independent UX consultant. With three decades of UX and L10n experience and outreach, he specializes in helping people ensure their global digital transformation makes sense culturally and also reflects how users behave locally.

Any views expressed are his own. Especially the ones you agree with.

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Is Your Development Relations Effort Global?

Personalization and Design, Translation Technology

Just back from a very successful visit to Beijing and Singapore where I delivered PaaS for SaaS enablement to local Oracle partners.

The Oracle Applications User Experience PaaS4SaaS enablement for partners in Beijing and Singapore saw a simplified UI deployed live to an Oracle Java Cloud Service-SaaS Extension service.  Is your tech stack and outreach in sync globally?

The Oracle Applications User Experience PaaS for SaaS enablement for Oracle Applications Cloud partners in Beijing and Singapore featured a simplified UI deployed live to an Oracle Java Cloud Service-SaaS Extension service. Is your tech stack and outreach in sync globally?

Oracle Applications User Experience partner enablement is worldwide, sure. We couldn’t live up to our enablement commitments and bring real software solutions to life in the cloud if we didn’t have an internationalized technology toolkit for partners too. Thanks to Java i18n and Unicode we do. With that baked-in globalization goodness, the sky’s, or should I say the cloud’s,  the limit for what’s possible with global user experience.

If you’ve got examples of how technology internationalization has helped your company go global and reach new audiences, let us know in the comments.

I’d love to hear about worldwide partner outreach or development relations in your company too, from localizing newsletters or tweets to exposing localization or other APIs and multilingual architecture in the cloud.

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Ultan Ó Broin (@localization), is an independent UX consultant. With three decades of UX and L10n experience and outreach, he specializes in helping people ensure their global digital transformation makes sense culturally and also reflects how users behave locally.

Any views expressed are his own. Especially the ones you agree with.

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Transifex: A Language Developers Understand

Language in Business, Personalization and Design, Translation Technology

I’m hearing great things from software professionals about Transifex, a SaaS translation solution based in Silicon Valley.  As I work in user experience developer relations, I Skyped in Dimitris Glezos (@glezos), Transifex founder and Chief Ninja, in Greece to find out more.

Dimitris’s background is in software development, Transifex originating as an open source project. The passions and principles of the FOSS development community, collaborating on a cloud-based platform, remain true today. Transifex knows how developers work in the cloud, and provides a user experience that makes sense to a world of GitHub, PaaS, Python gettext, RESTful APIs, Ruby, SaaS, and so on. Transifex has even been referred to as “the GitHub of software translation“, which is some accolade in the development community!

Transifex API enables integration of software development workflows and tools in the cloud.

Transifex API enables integration of software development workflows and tools in the cloud.

The Transifex user community now has more than 100,000 developers and translators, working together on over 10,000 projects. Transifex users range from well-known enterprises to tech startups and the open-source community. Transifex can quietly boast of a diverse portfolio of successful translation projects ranging from hundreds millions of words of online courseware to strings for wearables and apps. A testament that Transifex is not a “one size fits all” model, what is really staggering about such a breadth of achievements is that it happened without Transifex having a single sales person, or offering those LSP-style “services”.

The Transifex platform is development friendly and flexible, tooling up small pockets of remote developers to build iterative, dynamic content using 24/7 workflows and lean software methodologies.  Exceling with the detection of string changes and merging, Transifex is easily integrated into development environments through an API and command line interface.  Transifex works upstream too, a string pseudo-translation capability enables developers to test their internationalization chops before starting translation.

Transifex translators use a browser-based online editor. This user experience packs CAT capabilities, support for glossaries, collaborative tools, screenshot preview for context, and other cool features. Translation projects are overseen in a contemporary online dashboard experience (it’s translated, too).

Transifex user dashboard view.

Transifex user dashboard view.

The  editor supports the major file types (including XLIFF and “TMX), has built-in QA for code variables in strings, enables character limits to be set, handles singular and plural variants, and makes it easy for developers and translators to work together.

Transifex online translation editor.

Transifex online translation editor user interface.

“It’s translation the way developers want it, or the way they would have built it themselves”, says Dimitris. Most large companies have figured out a translation process, but many now innovate rapidly with small teams using agile frameworks and don’t want to build their own translation infrastructure. Developers are busy people who like to be productive,  solving code problems using smart reusable solutions, and don’t need extra work. “It isn’t easy to build a translation process”, says Dimitris, “Instead, Transifex is integrated into existing development tools and workflows”.

The Transifex success is based on an understanding of developers and translators and how they work, keeping both these users at the center of the user experience. An easy to use solution that seamlessly matches development processes and work styles with a community of online translators generates a powerful networking effect of kudos from satisfied users, who share their positive experiences with others.

“If developers love it, they talk about it!” says Dimitris. That’s the sort of organically-generated  customer experience that most can only aspire to, and money alone cannot buy. There are powerful lessons from Transifex  about how software development teams and translators can work well together, not least of which is “know your users”.

The Transifex story continues to unfold, and you can find out more about building international products using a SaaS platform in the case studies on the Transifex website.

If you have other examples of cloud-based integrations of translation and software development teams, please  share them in the comments.

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Ultan Ó Broin (@localization), is an independent UX consultant. With three decades of UX and L10n experience and outreach, he specializes in helping people ensure their global digital transformation makes sense culturally and also reflects how users behave locally.

Any views expressed are his own. Especially the ones you agree with.

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