Author Archives: Andrew Joscelyne

Andrew Joscelyne

About Andrew Joscelyne

European, a language technology industry watcher since Electric Word was first published, sometime journalist, consultant, market analyst and animateur of projects. Interested in technologies for augmenting human intellectual endeavour, multilingual méssage, the history of language machines, the future of translation, and the life of the digital mindset.

English into 3D

In a previous speculative blog, I suggested that text to visual 3D ‘translation’ might one day enhance our access to content. This report from the University of Ulster suggests that we may not have to wait too long. Professor Paul McKevitt and PhD student Minhua Eunice Ma, from the Faculty of Engineering at Magee, have...

READ MORE...

Hype(r)words

Words in a text are wannabee ‘hot’ links. So treat every word on a web page as a launch pad for searching, translating, pronouncing, defining, thesaurizing, etc. An old digital dream, already explored in dictionary/encyclopedia mode by Gurunet (“See a word on your screen? Just Alt-Click it!”), and from a more multilingual/translation perspective by Babylon....

READ MORE...

The old spark of Electric Word

Thanks to John Rynne, language tech nostalgia-seekers can reread bits and pieces of LT/Electric Word, a now-defunct computer mag founded about 20 years ago as Language Technology by INK (a pace-setting Amsterdam-based localization company) and edited by a certain Louis Rossetto. Louis even pens a sepia-tinted introduction to John’s site, explaining that although he knew...

READ MORE...

Keyboard as programmable interface

Check out this coming-soon keyboard from the Russian developer Optimus. Presumably still in the design stage, it apparently enables users to actually program their keyboard! Instead of being a dumb finger punch-ball, keyboards could become a customizable interface. There’s more buzz about it here, and some quirky information about it here – for example, that...

READ MORE...

A theory of translation: the short version

Just read a strange book (called Shutter island) by Dennis Lehane of Mystic River fame. A couple of characters in post-WW2 America talking about their wartime experience pretty much sum up why translation is possible in a multicultural world: “You was in sorts of places, huh?” “Yeah I was, saw the world. “ “What’d you...

READ MORE...

pi or omeros

Boing Boing reports (via the BBC) that a Japanese man managed to “remember” pi to 83,431 decimal places, doubling the world record. He took ‘several hours’ to deliver this mindless sequence of syllables (presumably in Japanese). I would have preferred to have been around 11 years or so ago when Stephen Powelson used to beat...

READ MORE...

Memory or machine?

In my Google alert for ‘machine translation’ the other day I received this: Lionbridge & Bowne: Waiting For the Other Shoe To Drop Corante – USA “… buying BGS would be and he answered “volume.” Now that Lionbridge has production centers up and running in India and a brand-new machine translation tool (sic), it is...

READ MORE...

SDL acquires Trados

A big event in the (smallish) localization business, but one long expected by insiders who tracked SDL’s rise and rise. Users at every level of the translator layer cake will want to know whether their (relatively pricey) Trados translation memory rigs will continue to be supported. Competitors will be looking out for opportunities to hit...

READ MORE...

L without H

Blast from the past: Jo Lernout, half the notorious Belgian double act from the 1990s, has published a “my story” autobiography. He is interviewed in this sepia-tinted International Herald Tribune article about a life that came unstuck after the dot.com years. “We absolutely had only one goal and that was being the leader in the...

READ MORE...

Key bored?

The standard QWERTY layout of the English language typing keyboard has been much debated by economists as an example of sub-optimal design achieving commercial success due to “path dependence” – a series of arbitrary yet defining historical events. Paul David started the ball rolling back in 1985 with this famous article on the ‘economics of...

READ MORE...

Secured By miniOrange