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Tag: standards

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GALA TAPICC starts for real

Language Industry News and Events

TAPICC is an industry initiative supported by GALA, TAUS and LT-Innovate to tackle the challenge of translation industry application programming interfaces (APIs). Last week, GALA posted the TAPICC project charter for public review, encouraging clients, technologically-advanced LSPs, tools vendors as well as research and education players to join the discussion. On this project page you can review all relevant resources including the charter and the open source legal agreements before you decide to join.

Each volunteer who decides to join the GALA TAPICC Connect Group or contribute to the TAPICC Github Repository (yet to be set up) will be prompted to agree with the open source licensing conditions. GALA TAPICC plans in the future to submit stable technical and documentation deliverables of the TAPICC project for formal standardization to OASIS XLIFF OMOS TC, OASIS UBL TC or other suitable standardization bodies.

Unlike many standardization efforts driven by informal consortia or trade organizations, GALA took the legal aspect of things seriously and leads the work under clear open source conditions, which makes subsequent submissions to formal standardization bodies legally possible. It is the best way to protect community-driven spec or API from turning proprietary.

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David Filip is Chair (Convener) of OASIS XLIFF OMOS TC; Secretary, Editor and Liaison Officer of OASIS XLIFF TC; a former Co-Chair and Editor for the W3C ITS 2.0 Recommendation; and co-moderator of the Interoperability and Standards WG at JIAMCATT. He has been also appointed as NSAI expert to ISO TC37 SC3 and SC5, ISO/IEC JTC1 WG9, WG10 and SC38. His specialties include open standards and process metadata, workflow and meta-workflow automation. David works as a Research Fellow at the ADAPT Research Centre, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.

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XLIFF 2.1 open for second public review

Language Industry News and Events

XLIFF Version 2.1 has reached an important milestone in its development. On February 7, the OASIS XLIFF TC members approved the second Committee Specification Draft and sent it out for second public review. The OASIS Administration made the call for public comments on February 9, 2017. The second public review period will end on February 24, 2017.

The public review draft was presented at XML Prague last week. You can read on details of the ITS implementation in XML Prague Proceedings.

The first “dot” release after XLIFF 2.0 delivers on the modularity promise of the XLIFF 2 architecture. XLIFF 2.1 defines three new namespaces and brings a full native ITS 2.0 capability via its ITS Module without breaking the backwards compatibility with XLIFF 2.0.

OASIS logoXLIFF 2 Core and 7 out of 8 XLIFF 2.0 Modules are unaffected by the 2.1 release. Apart from a major bugfix for the Change Tracking Module and the brand new ITS module, XLIFF 2.1 brings Advanced Validation capability. XLIFF 2.1 (and XLIFF 2.0 also) can be now 100% validated with standardized validation artifacts without regressing to custom validation code. The expressivity of the validation framework was greatly enhanced by the usage of Schematron and NVDL schema languages on top of XML Schemas (xsd) that were available in XLIFF 2.0.

This second public review draft implemented all feedback received during the 1st public review we were informing on in November last year. You can view the resolutions for each of the 20 issues opened during the first review here.

All comments from the wider community (those who are not members of the XLIFF TC) are collected through the XLIFF TC’s publicly archived comment list.

When posting a comment, please include the string “XLIFF 2.1 csprd02” in the subject line. You may want to number your comments if you’re sending a few of them, and the subject line should give an idea on what your comment is about.

Collected comments and the progress of their disposition are public and can be followed on the XLIFF TC JIRA project.

The XLIFF TC plans to have satisfactory dispositions for all comments by March 7,  2017, and approve the Committee Specification by March 21, 2017, if this round of the public review does not necessitate material changes to the specification.

For the progression of the standard from the Committee Specification stage to the Candidate OASIS Standard stage, early adopters within the TC and outside of the TC need to demonstrate implementability of the new standard by making public Statements of Use and posting those to the TC. Write to the TC comment list if you are interested in an early implementation and need advice. XLIFF TC will launch the questionnaire to collect the public Statements of Use in late February/early March 2017. We expect the OASIS wide standards approval ballot to take place during the summer of 2017.

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David Filip is Chair (Convener) of OASIS XLIFF OMOS TC; Secretary, Editor and Liaison Officer of OASIS XLIFF TC; a former Co-Chair and Editor for the W3C ITS 2.0 Recommendation; and co-moderator of the Interoperability and Standards WG at JIAMCATT. He has been also appointed as NSAI expert to ISO TC37 SC3 and SC5, ISO/IEC JTC1 WG9, WG10 and SC38. His specialties include open standards and process metadata, workflow and meta-workflow automation. David works as a Research Fellow at the ADAPT Research Centre, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.

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XLIFF 2.1 open for public review

Language in the News

XLIFF Version 2.1 has reached an important milestone in its development. On October 14, the OASIS XLIFF TC members approved the first Committee Specification Draft and sent it immediately for the first public review. The OASIS Administration made the call for public comments on October 26, 2016. The first public review period will end on November 25, 2016.

The public review draft was extensively presented and discussed at the FEISGILTT workshop at LocWorld32 in Montreal last week.

The first “dot” release after XLIFF 2.0 delivers on the modularity promise of the XLIFF 2 architecture. XLIFF 2.1 defines two new namespaces and brings a full native ITS 2.0 capability via its ITS Module without breaking the backwards compatibility with XLIFF 2.0.

OASIS logoXLIFF 2 Core and 7 out of 8 XLIFF 2.0 Modules are unaffected by the 2.1 release. Apart from a major bugfix for the Change Tracking Module and the brand new ITS module, XLIFF 2.1 brings Advanced Validation capability. XLIFF 2.1 (and XLIFF 2.0 also) can be now 100% validated with standardized validation artifacts without regress to custom validation code. The expressivity of the validation framework was greatly enhanced by the usage of Schematron and NVDL schema languages on top of XML Schemas (xsd) that were available in XLIFF 2.0.

All comments from the wider community (those who are not members of the XLIFF TC) are collected through the XLIFF TC’s publicly archived comment list.

When posting a comment, please include the string “XLIFF 2.1 csprd01” in the subject line. You may want to number your comments if you’re sending a few of them, and the subject line should give an idea on what your comment is about.

Collected comments and the progress of their disposition are public and can be followed on the XLIFF TC JIRA project.

The XLIFF TC plans to have satisfactory dispositions for all comments by the end of November 2016, and approve the second public review draft by December 6, 2016.

For the progression of the standard from the Committee Specification stage to the Candidate OASIS Standard stage, early adopters within the TC and outside of the TC need to demonstrate implementability of the new standard by making public Statements of Use and posting those to the TC. Write to the TC comment list if you are interested in an early implementation and need advice.

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+ posts

David Filip is Chair (Convener) of OASIS XLIFF OMOS TC; Secretary, Editor and Liaison Officer of OASIS XLIFF TC; a former Co-Chair and Editor for the W3C ITS 2.0 Recommendation; and co-moderator of the Interoperability and Standards WG at JIAMCATT. He has been also appointed as NSAI expert to ISO TC37 SC3 and SC5, ISO/IEC JTC1 WG9, WG10 and SC38. His specialties include open standards and process metadata, workflow and meta-workflow automation. David works as a Research Fellow at the ADAPT Research Centre, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.

IUC44

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IUC44

ICU joins Unicode Consortium. What does that mean?

Blogos, Translation Technology

On 18th May, Unicode Consortium announced that ICU joined the Unicode Consortium.

What does that mean? it’s not your usual announcement that this or that producer of emojis joined the consortium as a member. What happened here is transfer of governance of the arguably most important open source reference implementation of Unicode and CLDR from IBM to the Unicode Consortium where IBM is one of the full members.

ICU consists of two main subprojects, ICU4C and ICU4J, which provide C/C++ and Java libraries respectively. It’s probably the most widely implemented open source stack in the ICU-logomobile world, but also at the heart of non-mobile operating systems and search engines. Let’s hope that transforming the ICU Project Management Committee into the 4th Unicode Consortium Technical Committee will mean even more open and transparent governance of this extremely important Unicode and CLDR reference implementation project under the Unicode Open Source License.

Both the original ICU and the Unicode license — under which ICU is available from now on —were derived from the permissive MIT License. We have seen standards organizations such as W3C and OASIS take ever more interest in the open source toolkits for their standards. For example, OASIS very recently allowed association of GitHub open source projects with its RF and Non-Assertion Committees, yet making the governance structure of a reference implementation to a Technical Committee itself is a unprecedented move.

Let’s hope it will be for the greater good of all ICU implementers and (billions) of end users.

 

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David Filip is Chair (Convener) of OASIS XLIFF OMOS TC; Secretary, Editor and Liaison Officer of OASIS XLIFF TC; a former Co-Chair and Editor for the W3C ITS 2.0 Recommendation; and co-moderator of the Interoperability and Standards WG at JIAMCATT. He has been also appointed as NSAI expert to ISO TC37 SC3 and SC5, ISO/IEC JTC1 WG9, WG10 and SC38. His specialties include open standards and process metadata, workflow and meta-workflow automation. David works as a Research Fellow at the ADAPT Research Centre, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.

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