Author Archives: Andrew Joscelyne

Andrew Joscelyne

About Andrew Joscelyne

European, a language technology industry watcher since Electric Word was first published, sometime journalist, consultant, market analyst and animateur of projects. Interested in technologies for augmenting human intellectual endeavour, multilingual méssage, the history of language machines, the future of translation, and the life of the digital mindset.

The dyslexicographer

Margaret Marks at Translation Blawg rightly wonders what on earth the Webster’s Online Dictionary (WOD) is all about. Although there is quite a lot of background information available on the site, I decided to find out from its creator Phil Parker. Here’s the score. A Professor at Marketing at INSEAD, the European business school, Philip...

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Help not pity for the poor immigrant

Remember Bob Dylan’s song on John Wesley Harding: I pity the poor immigrant Who wishes he would’ve stayed home One way to help immigrants feel less deterritorialized is to follow this example from Norway, and publish online dictionaries expressly designed for this constituency. This particular set offers Norwegian-Tamil and two dialects of Kurdish. Now that...

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Localized English

Newsweek Europe (probably need to subscribe) this week has a feature on Global English. The basic argument is that a) English as a skill is perceived as the key to jobs and a future, and b) English as a speaking system is simultaneously fragmenting into (national) local Englishes congealing around regional intermediate standards (Indian, Caribbean,...

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What’s best?

Is there a ‘best’ automatic translation system? Sure. But you can only know by constantly testing them all across all languages against a vast range of specific tasks. In other words, never. “Best” looks like a Platonic idea, not a statement of fact. Lots of blogs and sites these days are quoting the Language Weaver...

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Collective translation of the Encyclopédie

The Encyclopédie Diderot et d’ Alembert is often cited as an early (1750s) beacon of choral authorship (140 contributors) in a traditional European culture largely featuring solo acts. An online version has been available here for some time for paying subscribers only, under the auspices of the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, and...

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Here’s Lingster

Seems to me there is a knowledge hole in the language technology communication space. There are lots of R&D sites and community events, a few dedicated news sites such as here and here that relay press releases, and one notable publication that is gracious enough to host this blog. What’s missing is any sense of...

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Get me a pronouncer!

On WOI Radio at Iowa State University, they’ve developed a Pronouncing Dictionary of Music and Musicians for use by personnel as a computerized database for printing “pronouncers” to be pasted alongside the words to be pronounced on the printed material accompanying sound recordings.” You have to learn the spelling conventions used, as this introduction shows:...

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