Tag: translation

Advertisement

Russia Orders Translation of Vital Records

Translation

Any registry records in Russia dating back to 1926 will be included in the translation of vital records, particularly from Arabic, Tatar, and Old Mongolian languages.

Russia has plans for a project that will digitalize and translate all the Russian public’s vital records dating back to 1926. Investing around 1.7 billion rubles ($22 million) into the project, the team will translate documents from several languages, including Arabic, Tatar, and Old Mongolian languages, according to the draft of a decree by the Ministers Cabinet.

“In a number of Russian constituent entities, there are civil status records drawn up in languages other than Russian (national, foreign). In this regard, to convert these civil status records into an electronic document, their preliminary translation into Russian is required,” the statement said. “The draft order provides for the clarification of the volume of budgetary allocations allocated to the Russian Ministry of Finance from the reserve fund in 2020, taking into account its increase by 1.75 billion rubles,” the draft states.

According to the document, the registry office contains numerous documents that need translation, including those listed above. “The indicated civil status records can be translated by specialist translators with professional knowledge of the relevant foreign language,” it says.

The calculation of the required additional volume of funding is based on the average cost of translation services for one act entry, approved by the Russian Ministry of Justice. According to the draft decree, translators will work with any records “drawn up on paper and stored in the registry office since 1926.” Accounting for factors like the historical significance of the documents, the special regime, and the terms of document storage, the translator cost to the registry office is also included in the funding.

Earlier this year, the Deputy Head of the Federal Tax Service, Vitaly Kolesnikov, said that the Unified State Register of Civil Status Acts would be the basis of the federal register being created, containing information about the population of the country. One of the provisions of the acts is that a “unified state register is kept in Russian. In case of inclusion according to the Federal law ‘About Acts of Civil Status’ in certificates on state registration of acts of civil status of data in state language of the subject of the Russian Federation the specified data also join in the Unified state register.”

Tags:, , , ,
+ posts

MultiLingual creates go-to news and resources for language industry professionals.

Advertisement

Related News:

Advertisement
SDL Tados 2021

Adaptive Globalization Releases Linguist Salary Report

Language in Business

A comprehensive guide released by recruitment company Adaptive Globalization provides detailed salary and job description information for the language service provider industry.

Adaptive Globalization has released the first comprehensive salary report for the language service provider (LSP) sector. The report details benchmark competitive salaries for an array of positions as a guide for employers seeking to attract and retain talent in the coming year. Moreover, it provides summaries of key roles in the industry, their progression paths, and their salary ranges across 18 locations globally.

Locations in the report include Austria, Belgium, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Poland, Switzerland, Spain, Sweden, Singapore, the UK, and the United States.

The report states that the global language service and technology industry is worth $49.6 billion, and “Understandably, for such a large industry, there isn’t one ubiquitous compensation structure. Instead it is typically determined by several factors.”

According to the report, some of the factors affecting salaries range from company type (LSP vs. client-side), to market conditions, to cost of living. Though the report does not mention how these factors, or others like gender or the COVID-19 pandemic have made an impact, they likely also play a role, as signaled by some of the LSP market movement this year. The salaries for linguists ranged anywhere from €14,000 to over €100,000 per year, depending on management level and location. Switzerland and the US rank among the higher salaries, while Poland and Italy rank among the lowest among the selected countries.

Breaking down some different departments in LSPs, the report outlines roles in sales and operations. It covers a section for linguists, which covers positions like translation checker, proofreader, interpreter, translator, transcriptionists, senior translator, language lead, language quality specialist, language service manager, head of translation, and language department director.

“Linguists are the people working directly with languages,” the report states. “They are detail-oriented people, with academic degrees in the source language. Typically they come with excellent knowledge of the most common CAT tools.”

Along with the positions for linguists, the report also includes localization management and engineering positions. It defines requirements for internationalization engineers, for example, saying they “are usually Software Engineers that specialize in designing mobile apps and incorporating the adaptation of different languages to the design,” and noting that they “are usually very experienced… and know the different nuances of each language (technically speaking).”

Adaptive Globalization specializes in language industry recruitment. Working with both language service agencies and large companies, the company recruits people working in the translation and localization industry.

Tags:, , , ,
+ posts

MultiLingual creates go-to news and resources for language industry professionals.

Advertisement

Related News:

Telehealth Firm Amwell to Adopt Google AI, Translation Tech

Technology

Promising advances to the telehealth services industry, Amwell will integrate Google Cloud AI capabilities for natural language processing and medical transcription services, among other new services.

Since the onset of the pandemic, telehealth services have skyrocketed. A Department of Health and Human Services statistical report found that in April, about 43% of primary care visits through Medicare were via telehealth. Before the pandemic, more than 99% of Medicare-funded visits were in-person appointments. From March through early July, the agency says, more than 10 million Medicare beneficiaries used telehealth services. With broad telehealth coverage more vital than ever, though, demands for language services have risen considerably as well.

Seeing the opportunity for growth, Google recently pledged to invest $100 million into Amwell, formerly known as American Well, a company that builds technology for virtual doctors’ visits. Launching in 2006, Amwell currently works with 55 health plans, which support over 36,000 employers and represent more than 80 million covered individuals, as well as 150 of the nation’s largest health systems. It has powered more than 5.6 million telehealth visits for its clients, including over 3 million since the shutdown began.

The partnership will leverage Google’s artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) technologies to create a comprehensive virtual care experience for patients and providers that goes beyond visits and includes services like self-triage or remote patient monitoring (RPM) capabilities. Google plans to work closely with Amwell to integrate its AI capabilities into Amwell’s virtual care platform, particularly in natural language processing and medical transcription services. This could have interesting implications for the language service industry, particularly the life sciences sector.

Additionally, Amwell will move parts of its business from Amazon Web Services to Google Cloud, recognizing Google Cloud as its “preferred global cloud partner.” Specifically, Amwell will move some video performance capabilities to Google Cloud. The two companies will also collaborate on technology and work to expand Amwell’s footprint in the sector.

“With this partnership, Google Cloud and Amwell see an opportunity to improve patient and clinician telehealth experiences through technologies that can automate waiting room and checkout; provide automated language translation services; advance population health by making it easier for more patients to receive care; and assist payers and providers in routine tasks, by intelligently triaging cases and reducing clinician burnout,” mentioned a Google Cloud blog post.

The post went on to describe how machine translation is being integrated into the system: “A conversational chatbot agent is immediately available to assist you, in your preferred language, by asking about your symptoms and the reason for your visit, and provides this information to your physician before she enters your virtual exam room. During your appointment, you continue to speak in your preferred language to your physician, while cloud-based artificial intelligence (AI) provides live, translated captioning of the conversation.”

Tags:, , , , ,
Journalist at MultiLingual Magazine | + posts

Jonathan Pyner is a poet, freelance writer, and translator. He has worked as an educator for nearly a decade in the US and Taiwan, and he recently completed a master’s of fine arts in creative writing.

Related News:

Disney Partners with Translation in New Ad Campaign

Business News

With the aim of capturing greater multicultural representation, Disney Advertising Sales has officially announced its partnership with Translation for its newest ad campaign.

Earlier this year, Disney Advertising Sales and Translation LLC began negotiations on a partnership to develop advertisements with greater, more organic multicultural reach. Due to the onset of the pandemic, however, delays had prevented the two from finalizing the collaboration until just last week.

Operating for over 15 years, Translation has made its mark on several industries, working with cultural stars like Jay-Z, Lebron James, James Dolan, Will Smith, and Jada Pinkett-Smith to create ad campaigns for the New York Knicks, Brooklyn Nets, State Farm, Nike, and UnitedMasters. Translation even recruited music artist Pusha T to compose the iconic McDonald’s “Ba da ba ba ba, I’m lovin’ it,” jingle.

“As an African-American leader of a mainstream agency for the last 15 years, this was a watershed moment for me, as I’ve been fighting the headwinds of trying to get a seat at the table, to make work for major companies and not be segmented to just the African American audience,” says Translation CEO Steve Stoute. “Now, they’re leaning in, understanding that ethnic insights are the insights of popular culture. Diversity is a way to connect to youth.”

Disney Advertising Sales brands include ESPN, ABC, FreeForm, FX, National Geographic Channel, Disney Channel and the owned-and-operated ABC local TV stations. Translation’s ongoing commitment to multicultural representation paired with a creative behemoth like Disney signals a momentous shift in the movement toward greater inclusivity in popular culture.

“Ultimately, we were in a place where we knew creative storytelling mattered, but we also wanted to be able to scale it across audiences, and scale the expertise with people who had experience with brands on how to make culturally relevant creative stand out in the media business,” says President of Disney Advertising Sales Rita Ferro. “Disney has scale and brands that matter. We wanted to take that as a foundational platform, and use the best brand partnerships—like we did with Steve and Translation on State Farm, and what we did with CreativeWorks with Ford—to create moments that stand out and drive brands’ business.”

One of the first collaborations between Disney and Translation actually came earlier this year during the well-renowned Michael Jordan and Chicago Bulls documentary The Last Dance. Airing on Disney-owned ESPN, the State Farm deep fake ad doctors a news anchor’s 1998 report on the Bulls to include popular 2020 slang terms. Although the advertisement was a hit, it also opened a discussion about the ethics of AI, especially in regards to deep fake technology.

Tags:, , ,
+ posts

MultiLingual creates go-to news and resources for language industry professionals.

Related News:

Moscow Translation Club Transforms to Russian Association of Translation Companies

Business News

The Moscow Translation Club has evolved into the Russian Association of Translation Companies — the localization industry’s newest association.

The Russian Association of Translation Companies (RATC) was officially registered with the Russian Federation government in July, and is on track to join the European Union of Associations of Translation Companies (EUATC).

Active member and co-founder of the Moscow Translation Club (MTC) Janus Worldwide announced the official registration of the RATC, an association that complies with Russian law and begins with 12 companies from across the Russian Federation. MTC members will become primary members of the association, and will be presented in the first RATC board. Margarita Yegorova of MegaText — a translation agency and board member of MTC — will serve as president, supervise activity, and represent the RATC in an official capacity.

Moreover, the three vice presidents — Serge Gladkoff of Logrus Global, Konstantin Josseliani of Janus Worldwide, and Alexey Shesterikov of Awatera — will take over the responsibilities of setting up international operations. Chair of the board Nikolay Kulikov of AKM Translations will manage the board and the association, and coordinate its governing bodies.

Founded in 2014 by leading Russian translation companies, the MTC arranges events to discuss issues in the translation and localization industry. Members of the MTC came up with the idea to obtain legal status for the RATC to protect the interests of the industry and promote its development with legal standing.

As founder of the MTC and president of the largest translation company in Russia, Josseliani hopes to apply his experience to the RATC to benefit the translation industry as a whole. He will manage cooperation with Russian legal entities and social organizations, procedural work, and any other responsibilities deemed necessary by RATC members.

Now that the registration has taken place, the association is slated to join the EUATC, which will enable exchange in and representation of the Russian translation industry. “We have been working with leading members of the Moscow Translation Club since last year providing them with our guidance on how to go about forming an association,” said Geoffrey Bowden, secretary of EUATC. “While there are some formalities to go through, we anticipate that the Russian Association will be admitted into membership of the EUATC at its next virtual General Meeting on September 18.”

Tags:, , , , , ,
+ posts

MultiLingual creates go-to news and resources for language industry professionals.

Related News:

Smart Masks in Japan Translate between 8 Languages

Technology

Adapting its translation software to meet the needs of a mid-pandemic world, Japanese startup Donut Robotics has created smart masks to aid in translation needs.

As the number of people wearing masks grows during the pandemic, Donut Robotics has developed new smart masks that go well beyond PPE, and fall short as well. Connecting to an app through Bluetooth, “C-Face” transcribes dictation, amplifies the wearer’s voice, and translates speech into eight different languages.

Donut Robotics first developed the translation software for a robot project called Cinnamon, which was designed as part of a Haneda Robotics Lab initiative to create robots that would provide tourists at Tokyo’s Haneda Airport with relevant information for their travels. One of four translation robot prototypes selected in 2016, Cinnamon began providing services at the airport in 2017.

When COVID hit, however, and airports shut down globally, Donut Robotics sought a way to adapt their translation technology and progress the technology while the tourism industry struggles.

Although smart masks mostly covers the face, their silicone and plastic design is not a proper substitute for PPE, and the company suggests wearing them over a standard cloth face mask. Embedded with a microphone that connects to the user’s smartphone, smart masks may contribute to social distancing norms while simultaneously serving as a walkie-talkie, scribe, and translator.

Haneda Robotics Lab originally stated as one of its consideration for choosing Cinnamon was how well the software performed in noisy environments. That quality could bode well for Donut Robotics’ transition to mobile.

Despite the company’s exciting developments this year, however, questions remain about the scalability and language capacity of the smart mask. Donut Robotics hopes to release its first wave of distribution in Japan, making 5,000-10,000 smart masks available by December of this year, but does not expect to expand overseas until mid-2021.

Furthermore, while the translation capabilities of the smart mask include some of the world’s most common languages like English, Spanish, and Chinese (presumably Mandarin), Donut Robotics will have to expand considerably before it can compete with the likes of Google Translate or Microsoft Translator.

Still, company CEO Taisuke Ono believes the “the technology is better than Google API, or other popular technologies” for Japanese language users, because most competitor apps focus primarily on translating to and from English.

Tags:, , ,
+ posts

MultiLingual creates go-to news and resources for language industry professionals.

Related News:

Paper Mario’s Controversial Translation

Localization Culture

Nintendo’s Paper Mario video game localization team has sparked a dispute about how it translated sensitive language from Japanese to Traditional Chinese.

Even without the pressure COVID-19 has put on game developers, video game localization requires several considerations. From redesigning food graphics or fashion choices, to adapting jokes to better communicate humor through culture, a video game localization team can stumble into sensitive content without even realizing it.

Nintendo’s July 2020 release of its newest game Paper Mario: The Origami King has sparked a dispute on social media about its localization process, specifically related to its translation into Traditional Chinese.

The argument centered around the translation of a conversation between game characters Toad and Mario. In the Japanese version of the exchange, Toad says he wants “human rights” and “freedom,” but the traditional Chinese version translates to “plain outlook” and a “peaceful life,” according to social media activist ShawTim.

The Japanese words for “human rights,” 人権, and “freedom,” 自由 are both part of the Japanese Kanji characters, many of which derive directly from Traditional Chinese. In fact, the only difference in the two words would be that the second character in “human rights” would look like this: 權.

With such a direct translation clearly available to the translation team, ShawTim’s believes the changes might shed light on pressure from the Chinese government, or at least the Paper Mario Chinese localization team’s proactive measures to avoid making waves in Mainland China.

Still, Niko Partners Senior Analyst Daniel Ahmad pushed back on any conjecture that the change was forced by the Chinese government. In a twitter thread, Ahmad questions the claim that the Chinese government exerted any direct influence, adding that the game has not yet been released in Mainland China.

He goes on to retweet an explanation that points out how the Chinese translation uses puns to make a statement about both better governance and origami. The tweet says that the joke is about toads not being forcibly folded into origami. “Toad needs a neat appearance” and “Toad needs a peaceful life” are puns — the pun is that 平整 (neat) and 平静 (peaceful) both have the component word 平 in it, which is a Chinese word for flat.

Along with the punning that occurs in the Chinese translation, the two end-words reflect linguistic play. Pronounced “Ping Zheng” and “Ping Jing” using Pinyin phonetics of Mandarin Chinese, respectively, the second character in each phrase carries a “J” and “Ng” sound to create a slant rhyme. In this way, the translation might elicit more of a jocular tone than a politically indignant tone, even while insinuating heavy subject-matter.

Whatever the video game localization team’s intentions on the translation, this dispute reflects a natural response to the sensitive nature of localization. Even in the absence of geopolitical disputes like that between Mainland China and Hong Kong, the process of translating from one language or region to another could unleash a world of unintended connotations.

Tags:, , , , ,
Journalist at MultiLingual Magazine | + posts

Jonathan Pyner is a poet, freelance writer, and translator. He has worked as an educator for nearly a decade in the US and Taiwan, and he recently completed a master’s of fine arts in creative writing.

Related News:

iFLYTEK Signs Agreement with Egyptian Ministry

Language in the News

Last month, iFLYTEK signed the Chinese-Arabic Language Translation Research Agreement with the Egyptian Ministry of Communications and Information Technology (EMCIT). The EMCIT’s AI and high-performance computing applications center will now work with iFLYTEK to develop research projects in Arabic speech recognition, speech synthesis, and Chinese-Arabic translation.

As China looks to expand its Belt and Road Initiative, the agreement will strengthen an infrastructure for further partnerships in the Arab-speaking world through the research and development generated in coming years.

Founded in 1999, iFLYTEK focuses on technological research in speech and languages, natural language understanding, machine learning, and adaptive learning. The company has won several prestigious awards, including the Super AI Applicative Award at the World AI Conference, and was listed on the MIT Technology Review as one of the world’s 50 Smartest Company in 2017 and 2019.

The company also agreed to a five-year collaboration with MIT in 2018 for a resource and development project around human-computer interaction, new approaches to machine learning, and applied voice recognition. However, MIT cancelled the partnership due to iFLYTEK’s implications in the Chinese government’s ongoing genocide of Uighurs, Kazakhs, and other chiefly Muslim ethnic minorities in China’s northwest region.

Despite the cancellation of the agreement, along with the techno-trade war between the US and China, iFLYTEK — like many other AI companies during the COVID-19 pandemic — has experienced positive growth this year.

The Chinese-Arabic Language Translation Research Agreement will help both parties finalize construction of a Chinese-Arabic automatic translation system. Furthermore, iFLYTEK will provide speech and language technology training and share successful experiences with Egyptian researchers and engineers.

Under former President Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian government implemented the Ministry of Communications and Information Technology to facilitate the country’s participation in the global information society. Currently headed by Amr Talaat, the ministry aims to implement strategic projects that will develop and secure the country’s information technology and telecommunications infrastructure.

At the Chinese-Arabic Language Translation Research Agreement signing ceremony, the minister spoke about the significance of using translation software to increase the exchange and distribution of knowledge and science and promote economic growth in Egypt and China. Chinese Ambassador to Egypt Liao Liqiang expressed excitement about the opportunity to establish its first diplomatic relations with an African country, and to cultivate a strong relationship with a continent that includes a significant portion of the world’s population.

Tags:, , ,
+ posts

MultiLingual creates go-to news and resources for language industry professionals.

Related News:

TICO-19 COVID Response Effort Welcomes TWB

Translation

Translators without Borders has joined TICO-19, a coalition of academic institutions and industry partners, in an effort to translate and localize urgent health-related resources and materials into languages without access to the latest information.

black android smartphone on yellow tableResponding to the worldwide shortage of translators and translated health resources during the ongoing pandemic, Translators without Borders (TWB) has partnered with several academic institutions (Carnegie Mellon University, Johns Hopkins University) and industry partners (Amazon, Appen, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Translated) to form the Translation Initiative for COVID-19 (TICO-19).

Preparing emergency and crisis-related content available in nearly 90 languages so far, TWB will serve professional translators and aid in the training of state-of-the-art machine translation (MT) models. Access to content like “Translation Memories for the Translation Community,” “Translated Terminologies,” “TICO-19 Translation Benchmark” (a collection 30 documents translated from English into 36 languages), and a number of other resources will provide many regions life-saving information.

Some of the terms include more general terms like pandemic or recovery cases, but also terms related to scientific terminology like viral nucleic acid and serological analysis (an examination of blood serum). One of the phrases it collected states, “Data reported to CDC are preliminary and can be updated by health departments over time; critical data elements might be missing at the time of initial report; thus, this analysis is descriptive, and no statistical comparisons could be made.”

With countries like the United Kingdom and Australia reporting widespread lack of translation resources for some of their most at-risk communities, the TICO-19 partnership with TWB may provide some much-needed relief in the near future.

“Language technology is a powerful tool that can help people communicate more consistently, quickly, and confidently about global issues like COVID-19. Yet many languages don’t have the necessary data needed to build this innovative technology,” explains Grace Tang, TWB’s Gamayun Program Manager. “We’re excited that industry leaders recognize this gap, and are working with us to develop technology that can help everyone communicate about COVID-19, no matter what language they speak.”

A language equality initiative, Gamayun uses advanced language technology to increase language equality and improve two-way communication for marginalized languages. Joining the TICO-19 coalition will help TWB build upon the mission of Gamayun to allow everyone to give and receive information in the language and format they understand.

“We’re excited that industry leaders recognize this gap, and are working with us to develop technology that can help everyone communicate about COVID-19, no matter what language they speak.”

Tags:, , ,
+ posts

MultiLingual creates go-to news and resources for language industry professionals.

Related News: