Tag: localization

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SDL Tados 2021

Adaptive Globalization Releases Linguist Salary Report

Language in Business

A comprehensive guide released by recruitment company Adaptive Globalization provides detailed salary and job description information for the language service provider industry.

Adaptive Globalization has released the first comprehensive salary report for the language service provider (LSP) sector. The report details benchmark competitive salaries for an array of positions as a guide for employers seeking to attract and retain talent in the coming year. Moreover, it provides summaries of key roles in the industry, their progression paths, and their salary ranges across 18 locations globally.

Locations in the report include Austria, Belgium, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Poland, Switzerland, Spain, Sweden, Singapore, the UK, and the United States.

The report states that the global language service and technology industry is worth $49.6 billion, and “Understandably, for such a large industry, there isn’t one ubiquitous compensation structure. Instead it is typically determined by several factors.”

According to the report, some of the factors affecting salaries range from company type (LSP vs. client-side), to market conditions, to cost of living. Though the report does not mention how these factors, or others like gender or the COVID-19 pandemic have made an impact, they likely also play a role, as signaled by some of the LSP market movement this year. The salaries for linguists ranged anywhere from €14,000 to over €100,000 per year, depending on management level and location. Switzerland and the US rank among the higher salaries, while Poland and Italy rank among the lowest among the selected countries.

Breaking down some different departments in LSPs, the report outlines roles in sales and operations. It covers a section for linguists, which covers positions like translation checker, proofreader, interpreter, translator, transcriptionists, senior translator, language lead, language quality specialist, language service manager, head of translation, and language department director.

“Linguists are the people working directly with languages,” the report states. “They are detail-oriented people, with academic degrees in the source language. Typically they come with excellent knowledge of the most common CAT tools.”

Along with the positions for linguists, the report also includes localization management and engineering positions. It defines requirements for internationalization engineers, for example, saying they “are usually Software Engineers that specialize in designing mobile apps and incorporating the adaptation of different languages to the design,” and noting that they “are usually very experienced… and know the different nuances of each language (technically speaking).”

Adaptive Globalization specializes in language industry recruitment. Working with both language service agencies and large companies, the company recruits people working in the translation and localization industry.

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SAS Localization Search Engines Available to Public

Localization

Expanding access to its search engines, SAS aims to create more cost-effective and efficient function for its localization software for users in the translation community.

SAS terminology manager Ronan Martin announced recently that the search engines in the SAS Portal are available to communities outside SAS. Already operating internally, these tools are used extensively by testers, technical support and in-house translators. Several factors have led to the decision to open the portal.

SAS uses language vendors for most languages and aims to provide better access to freelance translators, who can use the SAS firewall to review their own translations and compare translations of the same source text in other languages.

Along with granting better access to the translation community, SAS must localize software for contractual reasons. “A new generation of young analysts in non-English speaking regions who have only ever encountered many key terms in English,” said terminology manager Ronan Martin. “There is two-way push: translators and some older academics want to use localized terms, while younger people want to use the English terms. This is an ongoing struggle, but the portal at least provides a way of linguistically navigating the software for users who find themselves in this predicament.”

Martin also pointed out that localizing software is expensive and challenging from an engineering point of view. The company’s default position is to localize a software solution to the extent that there is a business case for it. This will usually encompass the user interface. Localizing documentation and user guides can be prohibitively expensive, as they are generally large. Responding to the barrier, users may interact with the software in their local language, and simultaneously delve into English-language documentation and guides. The portal can provide a bridge between the two languages.

Like many other software companies, SAS is moving away from shipping software packages and instead turning to cloud deployment using the DevOps approach. This entails developing discrete pieces of software that are slotted together in different combinations, known as a containerized approach to software development.

Academic environments are also of great interest. Students have free access to SAS software as part of the company’s academic programs.

“We hope that they will take this knowledge and experience into industry with them when they graduate,” said Martin. “We would like to support students, lecturers, course providers, researchers, authors and presenters of papers by providing terminology in the local language, to the extent we are able to.”

Furthermore, SAS expects an increase in situations where third party companies assemble apps using SAS containers behind the scenes. This could be an app developed in another language, or an English-language app localized outside SAS.

“This is a new exciting development,” said Martin, “But looking into the future we would like to establish an eco-system of SAS terminology that cascades down through the software, regardless of where, or in what language it is developed. We hope the portal will enable this to happen.”

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Lokalise Raises $6 Million in Backing

Localization

Previously bootstrapped, the software startup team Lokalise decided to raise external capital to hire top talent in order to accelerate growth, as it moves remote.

This week, Latvian translation software startup Lokalise announced that it had raised $6 million in a recent funding round. With a focus on translation and localization of apps, websites, and games, Lokalise provides a Software as a Service (SaaS) product that helps users improve workflow and processes when updating for different languages and regions.

“Initially we were just a handful of coders building a product for a pain that we ourselves were experiencing,” said Lokalise co-founder and CEO Nick Ustinov. “When top-tier customers started knocking on our doors we saw the larger opportunity at play. We quickly realized that the greatest challenge to scale Lokalise is in attracting the best go-to-market talent. Having met good VCs in both Europe and the US, we are happy that we picked Mike Chalfen as our partner to realize our vision.”

Lokalise aims to streamline the localization process, allowing users to upload language files or integrate them directly with GitHub or GitLab so that it automatically updates changes. Additionally, users can browse each sentence in different languages from the service, and a team of translators can edit text in the Lokalise interface all on the same page.

Similar to cloud-based platforms, Lokalise has collaboration features through comments and mentions, as well as assign tasks and trigger events based on completed tasks, like an email notification. Furthermore, Lokalise allows users to use Google Translate or a marketplace of professional translators, with built-in spelling and grammar features to spot errors.

“Most customers work with internal or external individual translators or language service providers (LSPs) directly,” Ustinov said. “The SaaS product generates 90% of our revenue — the revenue breakdown between the SaaS product and the marketplace of translation services is 90%/10%.

Founded in 2017 in Riga, Latvia, by tech entrepreneurs Petr Antropov and Nick Ustinov, the company has since attracted over 1,500 customers in 80 countries, from early-stage businesses, to scaleups and Fortune500 companies, including Revolut, Yelp, Virgin Mobile, and Notion.

“Every business has an online presence, yet inefficient localization remains a painful barrier to geographic expansion,” said lead investor Mike Chalfen. “Lokalise changes that. It has amazing customer references. Its beautifully designed collaborative tool and powerful integrations position it to disrupt the industry’s complex and archaic business processes. I am excited to partner with this ambitious team to build a new category leader.”

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Netflix Partners with NMG to Localize Streaming Services

Localization

Addressing issues related to content, user interface, and payment options, the partnership will grant greater access to the Netflix streaming service for Russian viewership.

Partnering with Russia’s National Media Group (NMG), Netflix will now localize its services to Russian viewership in the effort to expand access to the streaming service. Though the international version has been available in Russia since 2015, the partnership will bring significant updates to both the content and services starting from Mid-October.

One important change will be in the payment options. Available only to payments in Euros previously, Netflix will now allow viewers to pay in local currency, including payment options in rubles. With the collaboration, the company also has plans to increase the number of local Russian films, as well as to make updates to the user interface to better serve Russian viewership, including offering full access to Russian subtitles and dubbing. The films and services will be available to subscribers globally, as well.

“NMG confirms partnership with Netflix. According to the agreement between the two parties, NMG will act as the Netflix services operator in Russia,” said NMG CEO Olga Paskina. “We are currently working on full localization of the streaming service, which will enable us to provide Netflix’s services and content in Russian. This deal is in line with NMG’s strategy to achieve leading positions in digital and content media segments in Russia.”

Accounting for around 25% of Russia’s TV market, NMG will become the primary operator of the streaming service in Russia. The partnership is expected to comply with the Russian media legislation, which stipulates that foreign entities can only hold 20% of a company. Although the partnership will open new avenues for content, NMG will not be responsible for creating any additional content.

“Netflix is available in over 30 languages around the world,” said a Netflix spokesperson in a statement to Broadband TV News. “Almost five years after launching our English language service in Russia, we’re excited to provide a fully Russian service for our members in partnership with NMG.”

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Moscow Translation Club Transforms to Russian Association of Translation Companies

Business News

The Moscow Translation Club has evolved into the Russian Association of Translation Companies — the localization industry’s newest association.

The Russian Association of Translation Companies (RATC) was officially registered with the Russian Federation government in July, and is on track to join the European Union of Associations of Translation Companies (EUATC).

Active member and co-founder of the Moscow Translation Club (MTC) Janus Worldwide announced the official registration of the RATC, an association that complies with Russian law and begins with 12 companies from across the Russian Federation. MTC members will become primary members of the association, and will be presented in the first RATC board. Margarita Yegorova of MegaText — a translation agency and board member of MTC — will serve as president, supervise activity, and represent the RATC in an official capacity.

Moreover, the three vice presidents — Serge Gladkoff of Logrus Global, Konstantin Josseliani of Janus Worldwide, and Alexey Shesterikov of Awatera — will take over the responsibilities of setting up international operations. Chair of the board Nikolay Kulikov of AKM Translations will manage the board and the association, and coordinate its governing bodies.

Founded in 2014 by leading Russian translation companies, the MTC arranges events to discuss issues in the translation and localization industry. Members of the MTC came up with the idea to obtain legal status for the RATC to protect the interests of the industry and promote its development with legal standing.

As founder of the MTC and president of the largest translation company in Russia, Josseliani hopes to apply his experience to the RATC to benefit the translation industry as a whole. He will manage cooperation with Russian legal entities and social organizations, procedural work, and any other responsibilities deemed necessary by RATC members.

Now that the registration has taken place, the association is slated to join the EUATC, which will enable exchange in and representation of the Russian translation industry. “We have been working with leading members of the Moscow Translation Club since last year providing them with our guidance on how to go about forming an association,” said Geoffrey Bowden, secretary of EUATC. “While there are some formalities to go through, we anticipate that the Russian Association will be admitted into membership of the EUATC at its next virtual General Meeting on September 18.”

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TICO-19 COVID Response Effort Welcomes TWB

Translation

Translators without Borders has joined TICO-19, a coalition of academic institutions and industry partners, in an effort to translate and localize urgent health-related resources and materials into languages without access to the latest information.

black android smartphone on yellow tableResponding to the worldwide shortage of translators and translated health resources during the ongoing pandemic, Translators without Borders (TWB) has partnered with several academic institutions (Carnegie Mellon University, Johns Hopkins University) and industry partners (Amazon, Appen, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Translated) to form the Translation Initiative for COVID-19 (TICO-19).

Preparing emergency and crisis-related content available in nearly 90 languages so far, TWB will serve professional translators and aid in the training of state-of-the-art machine translation (MT) models. Access to content like “Translation Memories for the Translation Community,” “Translated Terminologies,” “TICO-19 Translation Benchmark” (a collection 30 documents translated from English into 36 languages), and a number of other resources will provide many regions life-saving information.

Some of the terms include more general terms like pandemic or recovery cases, but also terms related to scientific terminology like viral nucleic acid and serological analysis (an examination of blood serum). One of the phrases it collected states, “Data reported to CDC are preliminary and can be updated by health departments over time; critical data elements might be missing at the time of initial report; thus, this analysis is descriptive, and no statistical comparisons could be made.”

With countries like the United Kingdom and Australia reporting widespread lack of translation resources for some of their most at-risk communities, the TICO-19 partnership with TWB may provide some much-needed relief in the near future.

“Language technology is a powerful tool that can help people communicate more consistently, quickly, and confidently about global issues like COVID-19. Yet many languages don’t have the necessary data needed to build this innovative technology,” explains Grace Tang, TWB’s Gamayun Program Manager. “We’re excited that industry leaders recognize this gap, and are working with us to develop technology that can help everyone communicate about COVID-19, no matter what language they speak.”

A language equality initiative, Gamayun uses advanced language technology to increase language equality and improve two-way communication for marginalized languages. Joining the TICO-19 coalition will help TWB build upon the mission of Gamayun to allow everyone to give and receive information in the language and format they understand.

“We’re excited that industry leaders recognize this gap, and are working with us to develop technology that can help everyone communicate about COVID-19, no matter what language they speak.”

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Multimedia Localization Service Market Report Released

Localization Strategy

Multimedia localization deals with subtitling and translating scripts, creating voiceovers and dubbing, as well as animation, graphics processing, video production and so on. Importantly, the multimedia localization service industry has demonstrated adaptability in these trying times, with one video game localization team even using video calls to record voice actors.

Despite the disruption to the world economy this year, the continued success of the multimedia localization service industry would make sense considering its growing relevance in our daily lives in recent years. As with trends occurring in other language-related industries this year, the ingenuity and adaptability of the multimedia localization service industry appears to have the capacity for an upswing. Market.biz released a report recently on the impact of COVID-19 on global multimedia localization service market size, status and forecast 2020-2026 that will elaborate on the state of those trends.

Consisting of comprehensive data that aids in the detailed appraisal of the multimedia localization service industry, the document provides a summary of regional and global developments, the overview outlines the scope of the study, key market segments, ongoing trends among manufacturers, suppliers, and industries operating within the multimedia localization service market, and the implications of COVID-19 on each market by type.

Relying on SWOT analysis —a compilation of company strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats—that focuses on revenue and forecast by type and by end users in terms of revenue for the period of 2015-2026, the report analyzes the global multimedia localization service status, future forecast, and growth opportunity.

Furthermore, the report identifies cloud-based and web-based aspects of the industry, profiles key players and analyzes their development plans and strategies. Among these key players are Rev.com, 3Play Media, Language Link, RWS Moravia, Morningside Translations, One Hour Translation, AMPLEXOR International, Translated, ABBYY, Aberdeen Broadcast Services, Acclaro, ALTA Language Services, Andovar, applingua, Aspena, Click For Translation, Day Translations, Dynamic Language, Boffin Language Group, Argos Multilingual, among others.

Along with the numerous list of key players, the report was also conducted worldwide, in regions as North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, India, and Central & South America. With its global reach, it aims to define, describe and forecast the industry by type, market, and key regions.

As COVID-19 continues to spread, Market.biz anticipates “the global impacts of COVID-19…will significantly affect the multimedia localization service market in 2020.” Some companies are finding ways to respond, but many markets are already impacted, with flight cancellations, travel bans, restaurant closures, slowing supply chains, stock market volatility, and falling business confidence becoming the norm during the pandemic. The report provides a detailed analysis of what all these disruptions mean for the multimedia localization service industry.

 

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Game Localization Editor Discusses Voice Recording in Quarantine

Localization

PlayStation spoke recently with game localization editor Allie Doyon about her voice acting work on the localization team for the upcoming English release of videogame 13 Sentinels: Aegis Rim. Released in 2019 by Osaka-based video game developer Vanillaware, the dramatic scif-fi adventure game experienced great success, receiving nomination for the Seiun Sci-fi awards as the only game in the award show. Since that time, the game has planned a release once they have localized the game for an international audience.

Doyon, who describes the game as “a surprisingly heartfelt mystery across time, space, and human lives,” jokes that the process of voice recording into English presented a number of challenges, with the voice director providing extensive explanations to actors as they entered the recording booth.

As if getting the voice right in studio were not a sufficient challenge, COVID-19 brought about even more technical challenges, as it forced the crew out of a close-quarters environment. After some time to brainstorm possible solutions to this hurdle, the team came up with the alternative to record over video conference calls.

Setting up spaces in closets and other makeshift studios, the team had to work overtime to complete the recording, yet Doyon seems excited about the finished product. “Certain aspects of this game presented an incredible acting challenge,” she says about her team of studio owners, engineers, and other actors, “and I’m so impressed with how well they nailed it.” And regardless of company or team size, nailing it requires important considerations when working remotely.

Doyon has worked on game localization teams for a number of other video games for Japanese game developer Atlus, which produced 13 Sentinels: Aeigis Rim. Some of her credits include Catherine, Persona 4: Golden, and Persona 5. In her final note about her most recent project, Doyon jokes about how scrumptious food appears in the game, emphasizing the yakisoba pan, a Japanese novelty with stir-fried noodles stuffed in a hot dog bun.

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Jonathan Pyner is a poet, freelance writer, and translator. He has worked as an educator for nearly a decade in the US and Taiwan, and he recently completed a master’s of fine arts in creative writing.

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Project Underwear Q&A in Upcoming Webinar

Localization Strategy

How do people engage with and consume content online? Featured next week as a guest in a Lingoport webinar on language’s impact on online behavior, Nimdzi co-founder Tucker Johnson plans to discuss this and other questions with Lingoport CEO Adam Asnes. The material comes in large part from Nimdzi’s Project Underwear, which attempts to answer how people act if given the choice between English and their native language, and if they would they consume more if there were more content in their native language.

Project Underwear was created as part of Nimdzi co-founder Renato Beninatto’s idea that consuming content and making buying decisions can be profoundly intimate activities. Accordingly, considering how a brand interacts with someone in their underwear — or as Beninatto calls it, the Underwear Effect — creators of content and products might discover more effective methods of drawing in a larger consumer base.

More specifically, Project Underwear considers how the intimacy of one’s mother tongue can impact one’s decisions to engage with products. Whether communicating with users by email or other methods, the prospects of localizing outreach have broad implications.

With end-user surveys with 25 questions translated into 66 languages in more than 70 countries, Nimdzi understood from the beginning of Project Underwear that localizing language would be key not only to obtaining results without biases, but also to put into practice the foundational philosophy — to reach users in their native tongue.

Obtaining a notable sample size of more than 9,000 individual replies, Project Underwear will utilize data on each respondent’s language, gender, age, and primary occupation, that “allow for further segmentation of user preferences” to determine macro-trends occurring in shopping habits and buyer language preferences.

The host of the webinar is Lingoport, a company that provides internationalization products and services that help companies build localized software. The event will take place next Tuesday, July 28, at 9 am PST.

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Journalist at MultiLingual Magazine | + posts

Jonathan Pyner is a poet, freelance writer, and translator. He has worked as an educator for nearly a decade in the US and Taiwan, and he recently completed a master’s of fine arts in creative writing.

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