Translation

Academic translation considerations

Is it better to compose in my native language and have my work translated, or to write in English and hire an academic editor? With many international academic journals publishing articles only in English, scholars who are most comfortable working and writing in a different language face particular challenges when they are ready to share their work.

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The perfume of bad translation, part 2

Apparently my new favorite hobby on small airlines is to read their in-flight shopping catalogues — specifically what appear to be their worst and most amusing translations. I discovered this pastime a year ago, as some of you may remember. In this case, I was flying Aegean with a flightload of Greeks, nearly all of whom were engaged in loud conversation with someone behind them or across the aisle.

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Multimedia synonyms explored

A lot has happened in translation in the last few years, including significant advances in multimedia translation. A quick search resulted in a whole list of neologisms corresponding to new techniques and approaches in translation. The term surtitle in particular is a neo-formation coined following the same pattern as its cognate word subtitle.

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Eight tips to become the ideal translator

Professional translators are facing increasing competition, from each other and from emerging technology that threatens to replace them. Forging long-lasting and financially beneficial relationships with localization project managers and language services providers is key to survival. Becoming the ideal translator is possible with greater communication, attention to detail, professionalism, and being proactive.

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The power of positive language

What if there was an easy trick to be more persuasive and more positive, just by changing your mindset and the way you phrase sentences? English speakers have the option to voice both a positive statement and a negative statement that convey the same meaning. For instance, “come to the restaurant on time” and “do not come to the restaurant late” both deliver similar messages; however, the connotation behind the former is much less negative.

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